Health issues – Litmus MME http://litmus-mme.com/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 22:41:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://litmus-mme.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/lit-120x120.png Health issues – Litmus MME http://litmus-mme.com/ 32 32 Prison guards ignore ‘critical’ documents on monitoring inmates’ mental health issues, Delilah Blair inquest says https://litmus-mme.com/prison-guards-ignore-critical-documents-on-monitoring-inmates-mental-health-issues-delilah-blair-inquest-says/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 21:04:25 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/prison-guards-ignore-critical-documents-on-monitoring-inmates-mental-health-issues-delilah-blair-inquest-says/ WARNING: This story contains references to suicide. The inquest into the death of Delilah Blair in Windsor, Ont., heard Wednesday from a prison conditions expert who said care plans are key, especially for inmates in the mental health unit. Kelly Hannah-Moffat testified Wednesday before a coroner’s jury considering the May 2017 death of Blair, an […]]]>

WARNING: This story contains references to suicide.

The inquest into the death of Delilah Blair in Windsor, Ont., heard Wednesday from a prison conditions expert who said care plans are key, especially for inmates in the mental health unit.

Kelly Hannah-Moffat testified Wednesday before a coroner’s jury considering the May 2017 death of Blair, an Indigenous woman of Cree ancestry who was found without vital signs in her cell and later pronounced dead in hospital. Earlier in the inquest, two South West Detention Center (SWDC) correctional officers who were responsible for Blair’s care testified that they were unaware of a document that instructed staff to monitor the detained for depression and anxiety.

An inmate care plan was in place during Blair’s time at Windsor Jail. Two correctional officers testified earlier in the inquest that they were unaware. (coroner’s inquest)

These documents are “absolutely essential” for people inside prison mental health units, said Hannah-Moffat, who has done research and consulting work on justice issues for the Ontario and federal governments.

She has also specifically studied the conditions of confinement and prison reform.

In Blair’s case, his inmate care plan included details about monitoring for signs of depression, anxiety, withdrawal and psychosis, the inquest heard.

While officials have already determined that Blair died by suicide, the coroner’s jury is tasked with investigating the circumstances of the death and making recommendations to prevent future deaths. An inquest can be triggered automatically when an inmate dies while in custody. The Blair inquiry began on Monday after two years of pandemic delays.

Blair, a 30-year-old mother of four who had lived in the Northwest Territories and Manitoba before arriving in Windsor, was found in her cell on May 21, 2017. Blair had been charged with robbery. She was awaiting sentencing on a guilty plea at the time of her death.

She had spent time in the prison’s women’s mental health unit, which is under the indirect supervision of officers who at the time monitored inmates twice an hour.

The inquest heard that Blair was found in her locked cell with a bed sheet around her neck 22 minutes after she was last seen in the common area, as seen in security camera footage shown during the investigation.

During her testimony, Hannah-Moffat saw pictures of the SWDC male and female mental health cell blocks.

She described the male environment as being more spacious and having more light and windows for inmates to see the outside world. Male inmates also have direct access to a basketball court.

A photo from the Women’s Mental Health Unit at Windsor Detention Center following the emergency response linked to Blair, who was found without vital signs in her cell. (coroner’s inquest)

Hannah-Moffat said the Women’s Mental Health Unit at Windsor Jail appeared dirty, with no outside light or recreational activities.

“Terrible place to keep someone if they have mental health issues,” she testified.

“To me, it looks more like segregation, in terms of appearance” and not a “therapeutic space”.

Indigenous inmates face more challenges: expert

As an Indigenous woman, Blair had a different set of needs and challenges in prison, Hannah-Moffat said, noting it’s difficult to access elders or Indigenous medicine.

“When you’re talking about Indigenous women, it’s a lot harder for them to be in isolation or isolation than it is for others.”

Blair’s family say SWDC staff should have protected her. (Robert Blair/Facebook)

Christa Big Canoe is representing Blair’s family at the inquest and is the legal director of Indigenous Legal Services.

As noted in evidence at the inquest, Big Canoe testified that the SWDC lacked native support at the time of the Blairs’ death. For example, there was no Aboriginal Inmate Liaison Officer and there were no Aboriginal programs available in the Women’s Mental Health Unit or access to Elders.

“Not having elders would be very problematic because I think sometimes talking to an elder can really, really help a person. It can really ground a person,” Hannah-Moffat said.

“Not having access to it makes you feel more alone, isolated, more scared,” she added.

The two correctional officers and a social worker who have previously testified said they did not know Blair was Indigenous.

A lack of meaningful contact can be detrimental, even more so for Indigenous women, Hannah-Moffat said. Speaking with a medical professional through a meal slot in a prison door is not meaningful contact, but rather “inhumane”, she gave as an example.

“Especially if you’re attached to community and nature. It’s just as problematic for them, if not worse,” Hannah-Moffat said.

The night Blair died, two other women were in the same mental health unit.

‘Scream and scream’ heard

Krystal Warnock, a former SWDC inmate, testified that she never spoke to Blair face-to-face because they were under rotational unlock – where only one of three inmates was allowed in the common area at a time .

A day before Blair died, Warnock recalled, Blair shared with her a poem she wrote about her son, slipping it under the locked cell.

The night Blair died, Warnock recalled hearing “screams and screams” from her cell with a guard. She assumed it was about the TV remote that had been removed.

Firefighters and paramedics arrive at the SWDC Women’s Mental Health Unit around 8:13 p.m. ET on May 21, 2017, as seen in this image from security footage. (coroner’s inquest)

Earlier testimony from corrections officer James Wright said he heard Blair scream or scream while he was with his partner. He testified that the remote control was returned. Security camera footage showed Blair jumping around the common area less than an hour before she was found in her cell.

Warnock testified that Blair “seemed fine” when she saw her, but added that she observed that Blair felt restless and “must have some anxiety” and seemed rowdier than usual.

“She was more hyper, more awake,” Warnock said.

Blair’s access to call mum questioned

Blair’s access to her mother’s phone was also a key point in the investigation.

Warnock testified that there was a telephone in the common area of ​​the unit. However, to make a long distance call, a staff member would need to approve a written request and provide a separate phone.

Selina McIntyre, Blair’s mother, and other family members are still searching for answers to her death. (Dan Taekema/CBC)

Selina McIntyre, who lives in Hay River, Northwest Territories, testified Tuesday that she hadn’t heard from her daughter in four or five weeks. It wasn’t until someone from the prison called to say she was dead that she learned that Blair was incarcerated.

“She found safety in that. She trusted the system. She knew she had friends in that. She wasn’t afraid of the system.”

The inquest is expected to last nine days.

_________________________________________________________________________________________________

If you or someone you know is having trouble, here’s where to get help:

This guide to Center for Addiction and Mental Health explains how to talk about suicide with someone you’re worried about.


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Public Health issues heat warning for Elgin, Oxford Counties area https://litmus-mme.com/public-health-issues-heat-warning-for-elgin-oxford-counties-area-2/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 19:35:11 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/public-health-issues-heat-warning-for-elgin-oxford-counties-area-2/ This section is Present This section was produced by the editorial staff. The client did not have the opportunity to put restrictions on the content or to revise it before publication. by West Brant Window World Breadcrumb Links New Local News The St. Thomas and Oxford and Elgin counties public health unit issued a heat […]]]>

The St. Thomas and Oxford and Elgin counties public health unit issued a heat warning for Tuesday and Wednesday.

Content of the article

The St. Thomas and Oxford and Elgin counties public health unit issued a heat warning for Tuesday and Wednesday.

Content of the article

Southwestern public health officials said warm temperatures are expected across the region starting Tuesday and continuing through Wednesday evening. These temperatures are expected to reach between the low and mid 30s C.

Overnight temperatures above 20C are also expected for Tuesday and Wednesday nights, health unit officials said.

A Heat Warning is issued by the Health Unit when Environment Canada forecasts temperatures that reach at least 31 C or a Humidex value that reaches 40 C and above for at least two consecutive days, as well as overnight temperatures of at least 20 C.

During a heat warning, residents are urged to protect themselves and the most vulnerable from heat-related illnesses. Those most vulnerable to the effects of heat are the elderly, infants and young children, the homeless without shelter or proper clothing, and outdoor workers.

Anyone experiencing heat-related physical distress should seek immediate medical attention by calling 911 or going to the nearest emergency department.


A few tips for beating the heat

  • During extreme temperature conditions, stay indoors in an air-conditioned building if possible
  • Limit time in the sun when the ultraviolet index is most intense, usually 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Seek shade outdoors, especially at midday
  • Take cool showers or baths
  • Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated while limiting the intake of caffeinated and alcoholic beverages
  • Apply sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher about 20 to 30 minutes before going out and reapply every two to three hours.


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Public Health issues heat warning for Elgin, Oxford Counties area https://litmus-mme.com/public-health-issues-heat-warning-for-elgin-oxford-counties-area/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 19:32:19 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/public-health-issues-heat-warning-for-elgin-oxford-counties-area/ Breadcrumb Links New Local News The St. Thomas and Oxford and Elgin counties public health unit issued a heat warning for Tuesday and Wednesday. Publication date : June 20, 2022 • 53 minutes ago • 1 minute read • Join the conversation Southwest Public Health issued a heat warning for Tuesday and Wednesday. Postmedia Network […]]]>

The St. Thomas and Oxford and Elgin counties public health unit issued a heat warning for Tuesday and Wednesday.

Content of the article

The St. Thomas and Oxford and Elgin counties public health unit issued a heat warning for Tuesday and Wednesday.

Content of the article

Southwestern public health officials said warm temperatures are expected across the region starting Tuesday and continuing through Wednesday evening. These temperatures are expected to reach between the low and mid 30s C.

Overnight temperatures above 20C are also expected for Tuesday and Wednesday nights, health unit officials said.

A Heat Warning is issued by the Health Unit when Environment Canada forecasts temperatures that reach at least 31 C or a Humidex value that reaches 40 C and above for at least two consecutive days, as well as overnight temperatures of at least 20 C.

During a heat warning, residents are urged to protect themselves and the most vulnerable from heat-related illnesses. Those most vulnerable to the effects of heat are the elderly, infants and young children, the homeless without shelter or proper clothing, and outdoor workers.

Anyone experiencing heat-related physical distress should seek immediate medical attention by calling 911 or going to the nearest emergency department.


A few tips for beating the heat

  • During extreme temperature conditions, stay indoors in an air-conditioned building if possible
  • Limit time in the sun when the ultraviolet index is most intense, usually 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Seek shade outdoors, especially at midday
  • Take cool showers or baths
  • Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated while limiting the intake of caffeinated and alcoholic beverages
  • Apply sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher about 20 to 30 minutes before going out and reapply every two to three hours.


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Public Health issues heat warning for Oxford, Elgin Counties area https://litmus-mme.com/public-health-issues-heat-warning-for-oxford-elgin-counties-area/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 19:28:25 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/public-health-issues-heat-warning-for-oxford-elgin-counties-area/ Breadcrumb Links New Local News The St. Thomas and Oxford and Elgin counties public health unit issued a heat warning for Tuesday and Wednesday. Southwest Public Health issued a heat warning for Tuesday and Wednesday. Postmedia Network File Photo Content of the article The St. Thomas and Oxford and Elgin counties public health unit issued […]]]>

The St. Thomas and Oxford and Elgin counties public health unit issued a heat warning for Tuesday and Wednesday.

Content of the article

The St. Thomas and Oxford and Elgin counties public health unit issued a heat warning for Tuesday and Wednesday.

Content of the article

Southwestern public health officials said warm temperatures are expected across the region starting Tuesday and continuing through Wednesday evening. These temperatures are expected to reach between the low and mid 30s C.

Overnight temperatures above 20C are also expected for Tuesday and Wednesday nights, health unit officials said.

A Heat Warning is issued by the Health Unit when Environment Canada forecasts temperatures that reach at least 31 C or a Humidex value that reaches 40 C and above for at least two consecutive days, as well as nighttime temperatures of at least 20 C.

During a heat warning, residents are urged to protect themselves and the most vulnerable from heat-related illnesses. Those most vulnerable to the effects of heat are the elderly, infants and young children, the homeless without shelter or proper clothing, and outdoor workers.

Anyone experiencing heat-related physical distress should seek immediate medical attention by calling 911 or going to the nearest emergency department.


A few tips for beating the heat

  • During extreme temperature conditions, stay indoors in an air-conditioned building if possible
  • Limit time in the sun when the ultraviolet index is most intense, usually 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Seek shade outdoors, especially at midday
  • Take cool showers or baths
  • Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated while limiting the intake of caffeinated and alcoholic beverages
  • Apply sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher about 20 to 30 minutes before going out and reapply every two to three hours.


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Manitoba Health Issues Weekend Heat Advisory – DiscoverWestman.com https://litmus-mme.com/manitoba-health-issues-weekend-heat-advisory-discoverwestman-com/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 21:57:51 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/manitoba-health-issues-weekend-heat-advisory-discoverwestman-com/ MANITOBA HEALTH ISSUES HEAT ADVISORY – News Release June 17 With above normal temperatures expected across much of southern Manitoba beginning Saturday, June 18 and continuing over the weekend into early next week, Manitoba Health is advising that everyone is at risk of the effects of heat. People can die from prolonged heat exposure when […]]]>

MANITOBA HEALTH ISSUES HEAT ADVISORY – News Release June 17

With above normal temperatures expected across much of southern Manitoba beginning Saturday, June 18 and continuing over the weekend into early next week, Manitoba Health is advising that everyone is at risk of the effects of heat. People can die from prolonged heat exposure when their body temperature is above 40 C (105 F).

Heat-related illnesses are preventable. Older people, people with chronic illnesses, and people living alone are at greater risk, especially if they live in an urban area or don’t have air conditioning. Manitobans are encouraged to regularly check in with vulnerable or isolated community members, friends and family who may be at risk. Others most at risk are infants and young children, and people who work or exercise in the heat.

All Manitobans can take action to prevent heat-related illnesses by:

  • drink plenty of fluids, especially water, before you feel thirsty;
  • avoid prolonged exposure to the sun;
  • consider canceling outdoor activities or postponing them during the cooler hours of the day;
  • if you work outside, take more breaks and stay well hydrated;
  • wear loose, light-colored clothing and a wide-brimmed hat;
  • limiting alcohol consumption;
  • block the sun during the day at home by closing awnings, curtains or blinds;
  • take a cool shower or bath; Where
  • go to a cool place like a mall, community center, public library, or place of worship.

It is important to monitor symptoms in yourself and others. The following symptoms indicate that you or someone you are with may be overheating and at risk of heat illness. Move immediately to a cool place and drink water if these symptoms occur:

  • headache;
  • red, hot, dry skin;
  • dizziness;
  • confusion;
  • nausea;
  • weak and rapid pulse; Where
  • total or partial loss of consciousness.

If you are with someone who is fainting, confused, or feeling dry and hot, call 911. It could be heatstroke, which is a medical emergency. While waiting for emergency medical help, cool the person immediately by moving them to a cool or shaded place, apply cold water to large areas of skin or clothing, and ventilate the person as much as possible.

People should continue to take their prescribed medications, but it is important to be aware that some medications can increase the risk of heat-related illnesses. Using other substances like amphetamines, alcohol, or cannabis can also increase your risk. People or pets should never be left alone in a parked vehicle or in direct sunlight.

Any additional updates from the province on heat-related illnesses and prevention will be shared from the @MBGov Twitter channel throughout the summer. Updated weather forecasts are available from Environment and Climate Change Canada at https://weather.gc.ca/canada_e.html.

For more information on heat and health, call Health Links–Info Santé at 204-788-8200 or (toll-free) 1-888-315-9257 or visit the following links:


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English Bulldogs ‘compromised’ by health issues, vets say https://litmus-mme.com/english-bulldogs-compromised-by-health-issues-vets-say/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 13:03:32 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/english-bulldogs-compromised-by-health-issues-vets-say/ Vets are calling on pet lovers to stop buying English Bulldogs, due to ‘major’ health concerns. The breed, also known as the British Bulldog, is “compromised” by a “high rate of health problems related to extreme body shape” that has been high there, according to the UK. royal veterinary college (RVC). A new study from […]]]>


Vets are calling on pet lovers to stop buying English Bulldogs, due to ‘major’ health concerns.


The breed, also known as the British Bulldog, is “compromised” by a “high rate of health problems related to extreme body shape” that has been high there, according to the UK. royal veterinary college (RVC).


A new study from the college calls for “urgent action” to reduce the many serious health problems it says are associated with the breed’s “exaggerated characteristics”, such as their flat faces.


Vets hope the study, which finds English Bulldogs are more than twice as likely to develop a range of health conditions, will deter people from breeding and buying dogs bred to look like them.


In a press release posted online, the college said: “The English Bulldog has risen sharply in popularity in the UK over the past decade. However, its distinctive and exaggerated short muzzle, protruding lower jaw, and stocky shape have been linked to several serious health and welfare issues, including respiratory problems, skin diseases, and ear and eye disorders.


“Unfortunately, many of the breed’s problematic characteristics, such as a very flat face, deep skin folds and noisy breathing, are still often seen by many people as ‘normal’ or even ‘desirable’ novelties rather than major welfare issues.”


The RVC’s VetCompass program compared the health of random samples of 2,662 English bulldogs and 22,039 dogs of other breeds. It found that bulldogs were more than twice as likely to have one or more disorders in a single year than other breeds.


Some of the more common health problems included skin fold dermatitis, cherry eye (a prolapsed eyelid gland), protruding lower jaw, and brachycephalic airway obstructive syndrome (severe breathing problems related to the shape of the flat face of a dog), which was 19 times more common. than in other dog breeds.


The bulldog was developed centuries ago in England for use in bull fighting. Characteristically powerful and often vicious, the breed nearly died out when dog fighting was banned in 1835. However, enthusiasts saved it by breeding its ferocity.


Vets argue the public should embrace the breed’s more natural look, saying: “In the future, the English Bulldog should be recognized and loved for having a longer face, smaller head and unwrinkled skin. , which represents a more moderate and healthier conformation. .”


Dan O’Neill, lead author of the paper and associate professor of companion animal epidemiology at RVC, said: “Every dog ​​deserves to be born with equal and good innate health by having a natural ability to breathe freely, blink eyes completely, to exercise easily, to have healthy and flat skin, to mate and give birth.


“For breeds such as English Bulldogs where many dogs still have extreme conformations with innately poor health, the public has a huge role to play in demanding dogs with moderate and healthier conformations. Until then, prospective owners should “stop and think before buying a flat-faced dog.”


The study was partially funded by the Kennel Club Charitable Trust. Bill Lambert, manager of health, welfare and breeding services at The Kennel Club, said in the statement: “As this research shows, there are an increasing number of Bulldogs being bred outside of any sphere of influence and in some way because they are perceived as ‘cute’, with little regard for health and well-being A collaborative approach to tackling these issues is crucial, we must continue to work with breeders, veterinarians, and welfare organizations to reduce and ultimately eliminate the health problems faced by brachycephalic (flat-faced) breeds, as well as to reduce the mass demand for these dogs.


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St. Joseph County Health Department issues extreme heat advisory https://litmus-mme.com/st-joseph-county-health-department-issues-extreme-heat-advisory/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 20:00:17 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/st-joseph-county-health-department-issues-extreme-heat-advisory/ (Photo provided/St Joseph County Health Department) The St. Joseph County Health Department has issued an extreme heat public health advisory which can be found below. Public health advisory on extreme heat: Due to high daily temperatures and the heat index expected to reach over 100 degrees over the next several days, the St. Joseph County […]]]>
(Photo provided/St Joseph County Health Department)

The St. Joseph County Health Department has issued an extreme heat public health advisory which can be found below.

Public health advisory on extreme heat:

Due to high daily temperatures and the heat index expected to reach over 100 degrees over the next several days, the St. Joseph County Health Department is issuing a public health advisory. Exposure to extreme heat outdoors or the inability to cool down indoors can cause serious, life-threatening health issues. The St. Joseph County Health Department would like to remind the public to take the following important precautions to prevent heat-related illnesses and injuries:

• Wear Appropriate Clothing: Choose loose, lightweight, light-coloured clothing.
• Stay cool indoors: Stay in an air-conditioned place as much as possible. If your home doesn’t have air conditioning, go to the mall or the public library. Even a few hours in the air conditioning can help keep your body cool when you return to the heat.
o Keep in mind: electric fans can provide comfort, but when the temperature reaches 90°C, they will not prevent heat-related illnesses. Taking a cool shower or bath or moving to an air-conditioned place is a much better way to cool down. Use your stove and oven less to maintain a cooler temperature in your home.
• Plan your outdoor activities carefully: Try to limit your outdoor activities to cooler times, such as the morning and evening hours. Rest often in shaded areas so your body has a chance to recover.
• Take it easy: Reduce exercise in the heat. If you’re not used to working or exercising in a hot environment, start slow and gradually increase the pace. If exertion in the heat makes your heart race and leaves you out of breath, STOP all activity. Get to a cool or shaded place and rest, especially if you become dizzy, weak, or passed out.
• Wear sunscreen: Sunburn affects your body’s ability to cool itself and can make you dehydrated. If you must go out, protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses and applying sunscreen SPF 15 or higher 30 minutes before going out. Keep reapplying it according to the directions on the package.
• Don’t leave children in cars: Cars can reach dangerous temperatures quickly, even with the window ajar. While anyone left in a parked car is at risk, children are especially at risk of heatstroke or death.
o When traveling with children, remember to do the following:
▪ Never leave babies, children or pets in a parked car, even if the windows are ajar.
▪ To remind you that a child is in the car, keep a stuffed animal in the car seat. When the child is buckled up, place the plush in the front with the driver.
▪ When you leave your car, make sure everyone is out of the car. Don’t neglect any child who fell asleep in the car
• Avoid hot and heavy meals: they add heat to your body!

• Drink plenty of fluids: Drink more fluids, regardless of your activity level. Don’t wait to be thirsty to drink.
• Stay away from very sugary or alcoholic drinks, as they actually cause you to lose more body fluid.
o Warning: If your doctor limits the amount you drink or gives you diuretics, ask them how much you should drink in hot weather.
• Replace salt and minerals: heavy sweating removes salt and minerals from the body that need to be replaced. A sports drink can replace the salt and minerals you lose through sweating.
o If you follow a low-salt diet, have diabetes, high blood pressure, or other chronic conditions, talk to your doctor before drinking a sports drink or taking salt tablets.
• Keep your pets hydrated: Provide plenty of fresh water for your pets and leave the water in a shaded area.
• Know the signs: Learn the signs and symptoms of heat-related illnesses and how to treat them.
o Use a buddy system: When working in the heat, monitor the condition of your colleagues and ask someone to do the same for you. Heat-induced illness can cause a person to become confused or pass out.
o If you are elderly, ask a friend or relative to call you throughout the day during a heat wave. If you know someone in this age group, check on them at least twice a day. Infants and young children need more frequent monitoring.
• Watch out for high-risk people: Although anyone, at any time, can suffer from heat-related illness, some people are more at risk than others:
o Infants and young children
o People aged 65 or over
o Overweight people
o People who overexert themselves during work or exercise
o People who are physically ill, especially with heart disease or high blood pressure, or taking certain medications, such as depression, insomnia, or poor circulation

Community centers in the city of South Bend are open as chill-out spaces as well as local libraries. See below for locations and hours of operation.

• Charles Black Community Center, 3419 W Washington St., South Bend, IN 46619
o Opening hours: 8:30 a.m. – 9 p.m. Monday to Thursday, 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Friday
• Howard Park Event Center: 604 E Jefferson Blvd., South Bend, IN 46617
o Opening hours: 8:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Monday to Friday, 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. Saturday, 1:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Sunday
• Martin Luther King Jr. Community Center, 1522 W. Linden Ave. South Bend, IN 46628
o Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Monday to Friday, 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Saturday
• O’Brien Fitness Center
o Opening hours: 5 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday to Friday, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday
• Pinhook Community Center
o Hours: Usually by appointment, but someone is normally in the building around 8:00 a.m.

For more information, please visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at www.cdc.gov and stay up-to-date by following the St. Joseph County Health Department on social media ( Facebook and Twitter).


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Baby boomers are more likely to have multiple health conditions than previous generations https://litmus-mme.com/baby-boomers-are-more-likely-to-have-multiple-health-conditions-than-previous-generations/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 13:26:35 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/baby-boomers-are-more-likely-to-have-multiple-health-conditions-than-previous-generations/ UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania — Baby boomers are more likely to live with many chronic conditions than previous generations, according to a new study from Penn State and Texas State University. The study authors warn that the rising rate of multiple chronic health conditions (multimorbidity) among older Americans poses a real threat to the health of […]]]>

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pennsylvania — Baby boomers are more likely to live with many chronic conditions than previous generations, according to a new study from Penn State and Texas State University.

The study authors warn that the rising rate of multiple chronic health conditions (multimorbidity) among older Americans poses a real threat to the health of the nation. If continued, this trend will almost certainly put increased pressure on the well-being of the elderly, medical infrastructure and federal insurance systems. Similarly, the number of Americans over 65 is expected to increase by 50% by 2050.

The researchers note that this is not the first study to indicate greater deterioration in health among older people today. Going forward, they would like to see their findings help inform new policies addressing this national issue.

“Even before the Covid-19 pandemicwe were starting to see a drop in life expectancy among middle-aged Americans, a reversal of a trend that was more than a century old,” says Steven Haas, associate professor of sociology and demography at Penn State, in a statement. “Furthermore, over the past 30 years, population health in the United States has lagged behind that of other high-income countries, and our results suggest that the United States will likely continue to further behind our peers.”

The study authors analyzed data on adults aged 51 and over originally collected by the Health and Retirement Study, which is a nationally representative survey of aging Americans. Multimorbidity was measured by looking for nine chronic diseases: heart diseasehypertension, stroke, Diabetesarthritis, lung disease, cancer (excluding skin cancer), high depressive symptoms, and cognitive impairment. Variations in the specific conditions leading to generational differences in multimorbidity have also been studied.

Baby boomers in poorer health than Great Depression-era Americans?

Ultimately, the researchers concluded that older generations born more recently are more likely to live with more chronic conditions and to develop these problems earlier in life.

“For example, when comparing people born between 1948 and 1965 – called baby boomers – to those born during the last years of the Great Depression (between 1931 and 1941) at similar ages,” adds Professor Haas, “baby boomers had a greater number of chronic health problems. Baby boomers also reported two or more chronic health conditions at a younger age.

Notably, sociodemographic factors also seemed to affect the risk of multimorbidity among all generations. Examples include race and ethnicity, whether the person was born in the United States, childhood socioeconomic circumstances, and childhood health.

The most common conditions seen in adults with multimorbidity (all generations combined) were arthritis and hypertension. Additionally, some collected evidence suggests that high depressive symptoms and diabetes contributed to the observed generational multimorbidity risk differences.

The study authors say there are multiple potential explanations for these findings.

“Generations born later have had access to more advanced modern medicine for a longer period of their lives, so we can expect them to enjoy better health than those born in earlier generations,” Nicholas concludes. Bishop, assistant professor at Texas State University. “While this is partially true, advanced medical treatments may allow individuals to live with multiple chronic conditions that would once have proven fatal, potentially increasing the likelihood of a person suffering from multimorbidity.”

Professor Bishops adds that today’s older people have been ‘more exposed’ to health risk factors like obesity. Also, health problems are more likely to be diagnosed in older people these days due to improvements in medical technology.

The study is published in gerontology journals.


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Modern Student Mental Health Issues https://litmus-mme.com/modern-student-mental-health-issues/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 10:24:46 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/modern-student-mental-health-issues/ Student mental health and well-being are more important than ever by Intsab Sahi It would be a safe bet that the students of the year 2020 have much more to stress than going to class. Due to the global pandemic, campuses have been forced to close for most of this year, leaving students little time […]]]>

Student mental health and well-being are more important than ever

by Intsab Sahi

It would be a safe bet that the students of the year 2020 have much more to stress than going to class. Due to the global pandemic, campuses have been forced to close for most of this year, leaving students little time to adjust to the idea of ​​digital classrooms. Never before have students been forced to adapt to such drastic changes in the way they learn.

Before the global outbreak of the coronavirus, students from all walks of life had healthy outlets to channel their stress on campus. From extracurricular activities to group study sessions, there were always plenty of activities at schools and college campuses to buffer classroom stress.

Today more than ever, the presence of a mental health professional with students is necessary in schools and universities. Even though mental health attitudes are changing in Pakistan, there is still a long way to go to become a therapy positive society. To dismiss the need for a therapist on campus today would be to consciously ignore the impact of rapid changes in routine, fear of illness and new challenges to overcome as campuses open after more than six months.

Stigma around therapy

In Pakistan, asking for help and going to therapy is not common, largely because of the cultural stigma associated with it. Visiting a mental health professional is often considered unnecessary, and anyone who sees a therapist may need to do so in confidence.

More importantly, the common perception that anyone who sees a psychologist or psychiatrist must have a serious mental disorder drives the doctor’s office away in many ways. Therefore, if a student is facing issues related to their mental well-being, chances are they will end up seeking the help they need.

However, if schools, colleges and universities hired mental health professionals and encouraged students to participate in counseling sessions, it may well signal a significant shift in negative perceptions associated with therapy.

Ask for help

It would be entirely reasonable to expect that students returning to campus this year would require more attention than before. The anxiety around coronavirus protocols, social distancing and the new normal is sure to affect young minds. Students returning to school carry personal and psychological baggage resulting from the implications of the pandemic – these implications can range from extensive isolation protocols to the economic impact it has had on nearly every family .

Prolonged time spent in situations of dysfunctional family dynamics, depression, or simply a sense of loss are just a few of the many factors that can combine to affect students’ personal and academic growth.

It’s easy to overlook mental well-being if you’re a student dealing with course overload, adjusting to the myriad changes in your school environment, and general uncertainty in all facets of life. including education. Pupils may not realize the need for guidance until it is too late, but schools know best. They can take proactive steps by hiring professionals and creating a safe space where students can go to discuss the mental health issues plaguing them.

It is high time to normalize the need for therapy, according to Naqsh-e-Fakhar, an architecture thesis student at CNA. “It seems like we are learning how to fight war to survive at a much younger age now,” Naqsh says. “Everything has changed dramatically in the last few months. Our finances are all over the place, we are emotionally and physically drained, and to top it off, there is so much work to do before the thesis is submitted that we all have mini blackouts every day. According to the 20-year-old architecture student, “it would be a great relief to have a professional to talk to on campus, as they could help us through this feeling of emptiness and underachievement.”

The need of the hour

Dr. Tariq Aziz is a retired psychiatrist who now works from home and lends his expertise to a drug rehabilitation clinic. He believes: “It’s crucial to have a psychologist on board in schools and universities, I can’t stress that enough.” The professional views child psychology as an often overlooked issue in education and believes that children suffer the most when their mental health issues are trivialized, which is sadly all too common in our society. “Every time a child performs poorly, we begin to put more pressure on them to do well in the classroom. Instead of addressing the root cause of a student’s behavioral changes, we tend to make it worse by not seeking professional help.”

According to Dr. Aziz, “children often reflect their family pathology.” When asked to elaborate, he told Academia: “Children often react to what is happening at home or at school by fighting back at the teacher, disrupting lessons or distancing themselves. ” The psychiatrist clarifies that it is not always the child, but the family or the school bully who is the real problem. “We can only uncover the deeper problem by looking deeper into the matter, and if it doesn’t If there is no one at school to advise children when needed, their mental health will suffer and the real cause will not be detected.”

What to do

The mental well-being of our students cannot be ignored, especially now. An on-campus mental health professional can determine, through an assessment, the individual needs of a student dealing with something as common as exam stress to a more alarming eating disorder, to depression or cognitive impairment.

“If our education system starts prioritizing mental health when recruiting professionals, then seeking help for mental health issues will not just remain something you need, it will become part of the process. education, something you will learn from that could help shape your future,” Naqsh-e-fakhar says thoughtfully.

Having a psychologist on campus can no longer be considered something that only happens on western college campuses. The Pakistani student is no different from his American or European counterparts. To think that Pakistani college students don’t face body image issues, struggle with eating disorders, struggle with gender identity, are depressed, or experience abuse would be to overlook a problem. blatant.

It’s time we recognize that our students need all the help they can get, and that receiving therapy becomes less of a contentious topic.

However, to encourage parents and children to seek professional help, it must first be made available. To do this, policy makers and education actors must come together and require educational institutions to have a mental health professional on board.

It may take a long time to reach the aforementioned goal, but in the meantime, we can at least start the conversation, which has been waiting for years.


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Mental health issues closely linked to adversity and social and structural inequalities https://litmus-mme.com/mental-health-issues-closely-linked-to-adversity-and-social-and-structural-inequalities/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 10:00:27 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/mental-health-issues-closely-linked-to-adversity-and-social-and-structural-inequalities/ A recent study, published in Psychiatric Services, examines the prevalence and distribution of social determinants of health (SDoH) among adults receiving mental health services in New York State. The results of their large-scale cross-sectional survey reveal the disproportionate impact of unemployment, housing instability, low educational attainment, and criminal justice system involvement on consumers of public […]]]>

A recent study, published in Psychiatric Services, examines the prevalence and distribution of social determinants of health (SDoH) among adults receiving mental health services in New York State. The results of their large-scale cross-sectional survey reveal the disproportionate impact of unemployment, housing instability, low educational attainment, and criminal justice system involvement on consumers of public psychiatric services.

The researchers, led by Amy Ehntholt from Columbia University Irving Medical Center, draw attention to how the structural determinants of health are intertwined with structural racism and inequality. They write:

“The higher prevalence of each negative social determinant among people of color, particularly non-Hispanic black participants, was of particular concern. This inequity is consistent with the literature; systemic racism perpetuates the disproportionate frequency of social adversity faced by people of color.
“This study’s confirmation of the association between adverse social conditions and specific mental illnesses, the higher prevalence of these adversities among people of color, and the overrepresentation of people of color within the sample warrant further investigation. health equity.”

Social Determinants of Health Theory (SDoH) posits that human health is the product of the interaction between many structural conditions, including aspects of the physical environment, educational, social and health services, and broader sociopolitical forces such as structural racism and related inequalities. Ehntholt and the New York State Psychiatric Institute research team used SDoH theory to frame their research, asserting the “urgent need” to better understand the conditions of everyday life as ” powerful engines of health”. The authors advocate for the identification of social determinants in clinical settings as individual risk factors and for the development of federal policies and budget expenditures for programs that address these upstream determinants, consistent with recent directions from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

This paper examines the distributions of four SDoHs—educational level, employment status, homelessness in the past six months, and current criminal involvement—among a population of people receiving public mental health services from New York State. The researchers aimed to determine whether SDoH was associated with specific psychiatric or substance abuse conditions and whether the distribution of SDoH varied by gender, race, ethnicity, or geographic region of residence of service users.

Data comes from the New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) 2017 Patient Characteristics Survey, conducted every two years by mental health providers employed in more than 4 000 programs managed or approved by the OMH.

The authors examined the survey responses of 103,416 adults (ages 18-65) who received public OMH services for mental or emotional disorders between October 23rd and October 29e, 2017. Demographics collected included age, gender, race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, or other), and region of residence (New York vs rest of state). The four SDoH domains captured by the survey were education level (<12e année, 12e année / diplôme d'études secondaires,> Grade 12), employment status (unemployed, part-time, full-time), homelessness in the past six months (yes/no), and any current criminal court involvement (yes/no). The provider also reported any psychiatric and substance use diagnoses.

The survey results show that half of the service recipients were women (51.3%); 44.5% were non-Hispanic white, 26.9% were non-Hispanic black, 21.8% were Hispanic, and 6.7% were coded as “other race”. Half of the service users (50.4%) resided in New York. In particular, the researchers point to the possibility of discrepancies between provider reporting of demographic characteristics and self-identification of service users.

Nearly a third of service users reported having a primary diagnosis of psychotic disorder (29.9%) and a quarter of depressive disorder (25.9%). Prevalence rates for bipolar disorder (14.9%) and anxiety disorder (8.9%) were lower. Additionally, the proportion of adults with a co-occurring substance use disorder was 13.3% for alcohol-related disorders and 21.5% for drug-related disorders.

The SDoH results show that one-fifth of service users (20.9%) had less than 12 years of education. Additionally, the majority were unemployed (79.1%), 12.2% were currently under correctional supervision, and 8.2% had recently been homeless.

Among people with adverse social conditions (low education, unemployment, involvement with the justice and criminal systems, recent homelessness), a psychotic disorder was the most common primary diagnosis. Social determinants were also highly prevalent among adults with substance use disorders: 87.3% of those with drug use disorders were unemployed and 25.1% were currently involved in the justice system. penal.

Non-Hispanic black service users had the highest rates of unemployment (86.3%), recent homelessness (12.7%), and criminal involvement (17.2%) compared to white and Hispanic participants non-Hispanics. Rates of low education (

The authors then contextualized their findings by comparing SDoH prevalence rates in the sample to those in the general New York State population, revealing significant discrepancies. For example, recipients of mental health services had lower high school graduation rates than the general population (79.1% versus 86.5%, respectively) and significantly lower unemployment rates. higher (79.1% vs. 4.4%), housing instability (8.2% vs. 0.5%), and criminal and judicial involvement (12.2% vs. 1.0%) .

The striking overrepresentation of adverse social conditions among service users across the state is concerning, given the known associations between poor quality educationunderemploymentand criminal-legal involvement and an increased risk of physical health problems and poor mental health outcomes. The researchers’ findings that SDoH was most prevalent among people with psychotic spectrum disorders, in particular, are consistent with previous research that has linked structural inequalities to the risk of psychosis.

The authors also note that the high prevalence of all social determinants among service users of color, particularly non-Hispanic blacks, is consistent with research linking systemic racism to health disparitieswhich can be further compounded by discrimination based on mental health diagnosis status:

“Racism and discrimination at the individual level against people with substance use disorders and mental illnesses can further hinder employment and education opportunities while increasing the likelihood of being involved in the criminal justice system.

Given the cross-sectional nature of the data in this article, the direction of causation (e.g., SDoH causes mental illness) cannot be assumed. Additionally, the authors suggest the potential for reciprocal relationships between the variables:

“A two-way relationship may exist, compounding the likelihood of a poorer disease course and worse outcome. For example, unemployment may increase depressive symptoms; depression may also increase the risk of becoming unemployed.

Similarly, the disproportionately high rates of criminal and judicial involvement observed in the study sample may be emblematic of both overcriminalization of people with mental illness and the detrimental impact that the involvement of criminal justice systems (eg, victimization by the police) can have on mental health, especially for people of color.

A few key limitations of the current study are noteworthy. The combination of ‘race’ and ‘ethnicity’ into a single category and the inclusion of ‘other’ as a racial category are both problematic, as they impede understanding of the actual racial and ethnic composition of the sample. In addition, many relevant social determinants were not included in the analyzes (eg food insecurity). The authors point out that these limitations result from the use of administrative data from the state mental health system and indicate “a lack of standardized screening for social determinants during admission and routine assessment.”

By leveraging data from routine clinical services for their research, researchers highlight inequities in patients’ social conditions and the inadequacies of current approaches to identifying and addressing social determinants in mental health care settings.

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Ehntholt, A., Frimpong, EY, Compton, MT, Rowan, GA, Ferdousi, W., Swetnam, H., … & Rotter, M. (2022). Prevalence and correlates of four social determinants in a statewide survey of licensed mental health services. Psychiatric servicesappi-ps. (Link)


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