Understanding the impact of the lack of “mental health education” in schools

Schools, teachers and educators can be the first line of defense against mental illness and against practices that harm students’ mental health and yet there is a dire lack of mental health education in our schools. and in the education system in general. Today’s dynamic world demands too much of growing children, teenagers and even young adults, and as a result the impact on their mental health is immeasurable. The way we deal with mental health in schools and institutions is at best less than ideal and at worst completely harmful to the child. The lack of mental health education in schools should not have been a feature of 21st century education and yet we find ourselves in this position where access to mental health is a task not only for students but also for adults in their own right.

If we go out and ask the first person we meet on the street how prepared they have been by their school to understand mental health and how well equipped they are to deal with mental health issues, we will be welcomed by teasing or joking, if not anger. It’s simply because schools don’t value mental health education. This is despite an alarming increase in rates of suicide and mental illness among adolescents and the fact that suicide is the second leading cause of death among people aged 15-24. More than half of people with a lifelong mental illness begin to struggle before they even reach the age of 14. Studies indicate that most of these people don’t even receive treatment for 10 years after onset. Research has indicated that teaching them about mental health earlier makes those seeking help more likely to seek help sooner. This would not only improve the quality of their life but also help them get the proper help they need to deal with these mental health issues.

Even in educational institutions that try to prioritize the mental health of their students and do their best to include mental health education in schools, the curriculum related to the field is often inadequate and the teachers who provide this education are often not well trained to deal with such subjects. In theory this leads to inadequate mental health education, but in practice it perpetuates the stigma around mental health as well as the stigma around seeking help for mental health issues. In addition, students who already suffer from mental illnesses, as well as mental disorders of certain types, are much more likely to face the lack of mental health awareness and education that ideally should be provided in schools. schools. Many educators and teachers are ill-equipped to deal with these students and end up causing more harm than they provide help. Studies have shown that over 70% of adults with mental illnesses have symptoms that began during childhood and adolescence, and as such, it is becoming abundantly clear that today’s teenagers and students desperately needing help not only in identifying mental health issues, but also is about stigma-free accessibility.

The main goal of mental health education is to raise awareness about mental health. Awareness includes providing students with information about negative and positive mental health, as well as teaching them to recognize these mental health issues in themselves and those around them so that early intervention of mental health issues can be performed to counter and mitigate their effects. Teaching students about it in an appropriate way, free from shame, embarrassment, or stereotyping, can encourage them to see mental health as something without embarrassment, and as a result, the stigma that deeply surrounds mental health can slowly be eliminated.

Unfortunately, the lack of this very important mental health education in schools has caused stigma around mental health to become entrenched in society and as a result access to mental health services has become increasingly more difficult for people. This is especially true in the case of people who come from or belong to marginalized societies and groups and who are usually at the lower end of the socio-economic strata. Similarly, students who are more likely to struggle in school with their academics and general sociability are much more likely to be ostracized by their peers, friends, and teachers. Similarly, students who are categorized as “at-risk students” and who are more likely to not even complete high school are in much greater need of mental health education.

Many students labeled as delinquents or victims of abuse are much more likely to grow up with mental health issues. Studies have shown that smart students have far less income as adults than their peers who have not experienced any abuse and come from a regular background. He goes on to say that mental illness not only affects a person’s mental health, but its implications can be far-reaching and can impact children’s futures in ways ordinary people might not even consider. So not only does the lack of education about mental health issues harm ordinary students, it also harms students who already face one or another disadvantage, and contributes to social inequality.

The lack of mental health resources and education in schools and educational institutions plays a very big role in students being mean and mean to other students and ordinary people who face mental health issues and challenges. Not only that, but it also makes students with mental illnesses hesitant to seek out resources that can help improve their mental health and ultimately make them suffer for years with their mental health issues. It also makes them suffer from the shame and embarrassment that comes with the stigma and bullying that occurs in schools and society at large as a result of mental illness.

It is also important to note that many schools do not have a budget for mental health education or mental health education instructors and appropriate staff who can help impart this education to students as well as other teachers and school staff. Schools knowingly or unknowingly participate in such practices that harm the mental health of students. Business students don’t know that these mental health issues are much more common than they think and when they don’t know that asking for help for these mental health issues is not something they have to be ashamed, their mental health suffers even more And the cycle of stigma associated with mental illness continues indefinitely.

Traditionally, many schools and educators have been a catalyst for harming student mental health. The cost and remedy of the problem cannot be the same. It therefore becomes very important for schools to ensure that their education teachers are caring towards their students and understand the impact that mental health issues could have on the student’s future. To counter this, it is extremely important that teachers are equipped and trained properly to handle cases of mental health determination in their students. Teachers may not be able to identify mental health issues in their students, but they can at least be sensitive and attentive to them. Additionally, schools need a proper start comprising of school counsellors, psychologists, untrained teachers who understand the importance of mental health education and try to impart this education in the best possible way to students. . Another important factor that is important in ensuring mental health education in schools is appropriate is that mental health instructors and teachers should be kind and understanding to students.

Even though many schools and educational institutes have tried to implement mental health education in their curriculum and general education, the effect of such mental health training and education is not will not be fully perceived in society and in the minds of developing students until and unless education about mental health problems and mental illnesses becomes mainstream and popularized. Likewise, eliminating the stigma surrounding mental health issues can only happen if and until mental health education becomes a regular feature of educational institutions. Students’ ability to access mental health services that can help them resolve mental health issues should not be limited by schools or by their circumstances and backgrounds. Everything can only be achieved when mental health services and mental health education become accessible to all students, which means compulsory education. The challenges of today’s world are complex. We live in a time where the happiness of a historic, once-in-a-lifetime event becomes a matter of happening once in a few weeks. As such, the need for the rapid and immediate inclusion of mental health education in schools becomes incredibly clear.

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Estimate

Unfortunately, the lack of this very important mental health education in schools has caused stigma around mental health to become entrenched in society and as a result access to mental health services has become increasingly more difficult for people.

Traditionally, many schools and educators have been a catalyst for harming student mental health. The cost and remedy of the problem cannot be the same. It therefore becomes very important for schools to ensure that their education teachers are caring towards their students and understand the impact that mental health issues could have on the student’s future.


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