Health issues – Litmus MME http://litmus-mme.com/ Wed, 25 May 2022 09:02:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://litmus-mme.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/lit-120x120.png Health issues – Litmus MME http://litmus-mme.com/ 32 32 Mental health issues remain on the minds of student-athletes https://litmus-mme.com/mental-health-issues-remain-on-the-minds-of-student-athletes/ Tue, 24 May 2022 16:06:50 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/mental-health-issues-remain-on-the-minds-of-student-athletes/ History links Survey Results (Fall 2021) Executive Summary (Fall 2021) As an extension of two NCAA student-athlete wellness studies conducted in 2020, student-athletes continue to report high levels of mental health issues. The data indicates that rates of mental exhaustion, […]]]>

As an extension of two NCAA student-athlete wellness studies conducted in 2020, student-athletes continue to report high levels of mental health issues.

The data indicates that rates of mental exhaustion, anxiety and depression have changed little since the fall of 2020 and remain 1.5 to twice as high as those identified before the COVID-19 pandemic. However, student-athletes reported lower levels of hopelessness in the fall of 2021 than in the first year of the pandemic.

The Association-wide investigation, which was open from November 17 to December 17. 13, received responses from over 9,800 student-athletes. It was designed by NCAA Research in conjunction with the NCAA Institute of Sports Science and the Division I, II and III Student-Athlete Advisory Committees.

This study did not measure the responses of student-athletes compared to the general student population, which also struggles with these mental health issues.

When asked about mental health support, 69% of female sport participants and 63% of male sport participants agreed or strongly agreed that they knew where to go on the campus if they had mental health issues.

Under the NCAA constitution, each member school is responsible for facilitating an environment that supports physical and mental health within athletics by ensuring access to appropriate resources and open engagement with regards to physical health. and mental.

But when asked if they would feel comfortable seeking help from a mental health care provider on campus, less than half of female and male sports participants said they would agree or strongly agree with this statement (48% and 46%, respectively).

Continuing outreach efforts on campus is one way to try to change the disconnect between knowing where to go if mental health issues arise and feeling comfortable asking for that help.

“A lot of what influences the focus on this topic is the type of conversations that happen on campus around mental health,” said Scott Hamilton, clinical mental health advisor at DePauw. “Are there groups on campus, either through the athletics department or through counseling services, using their voice to help reduce stigma?”

Hamilton is also the student-athlete mental health coordinator at DePauw. In this role, Hamilton has witnessed firsthand how student-athlete attitudes can change.

He said it is fascinating to conduct mindfulness training or psychological flexibility training with a team.

“Within a week or two, you start seeing familiar faces pop up at the counseling center,” said Hamilton, who has worked at DePauw for 12 years. “When college campuses are ready to have open conversations about the importance of mental health, taking care of yourself mentally can ease the apprehension of student-athletes seeking help.”

The Institute of Sport Science provides health and safety resources for varsity athletes, coaches, athletic administrators, and campus partners. Educational resources on mental health include a review of best practices, data and research, as well as summits and task forces.

The survey included a question about teammates taking each other’s mental health issues seriously. Sixty-five percent of female sport participants and 58% of male sport participants agreed or strongly agreed. Similarly, 56% of both male and female sport participants said they know how to help a teammate with a mental health issue.

When asked if they thought their mental health was a priority for their athletic department, 55% of male athletic participants and 47% of female athletic student-athletes agreed or strongly agreed.

When asked if their coaches took their mental health issues seriously, 59% of male sport participants agreed or strongly agreed, and 50% of female sport participants did.

Mental health issues during the pandemic

Mental health issues continued to be highest among student-athlete demographic subgroups with generally higher rates of mental distress (women, student-athletes of color, those who identify with the queer spectrum, and those who declare family economic difficulties).

This survey, along with the two previous surveys, asked participants if they felt mentally drained, had difficulty sleeping, felt overwhelming anxiety, felt sad, felt a sense of loss, or thought things were hopeless.

The largest percentage point decrease was seen among female athletes surveyed for feelings of loneliness or hopelessness.

Sixteen percent of women’s sports participants said they felt very lonely all the time or almost every day, a drop of 5 percentage points from the fall 2020 survey. Ten percent of women’s sports respondents said feeling like things were hopeless, compared to 16% who answered this way in the previous survey.

Thirty-eight percent of female athletes and 22% of male athletes reported feeling mentally exhausted constantly or almost every day, the most commonly reported concern.

Academic experiences

Student-athletes expressed more optimism about their ability to attend and succeed in their fall 2021 classes compared to spring and fall 2020.

Half of student-athletes were satisfied with their ability to balance study and extracurricular activities, including athletics. Self-reported balance was higher in male athletes (56%) than in females (47%).

Transfer Factors

Since the Division I governance structure amended one-time transfer exception rules to include baseball, soccer, men’s and women’s basketball, and men’s ice hockey prior to the 2021-22 college year, transfers have become a more hot topic with media and fans alike.

Eight percent of all student-athletes responding said they were likely to transfer at some point in the 2021-22 academic year.

Mental health (61% of female athletes, 40% of male athletes), conflict with a coach or teammates (56% of female athletes, 34% of male athletes) and playing time (34% of female athletes, 36 % of athletic men) were the most cited reasons for considering transfers, among those who considered doing so at some point in the year.

Racial and Gender Equity

Student-athletes continue to volunteer in their communities, participate in social and civic engagement activities, and learn about injustices for themselves.

Eighty-four percent of female sports respondents and 78% of male sports respondents said they occasionally or frequently volunteer. Two-thirds of male and female sports participants said they occasionally or frequently discuss politics.

When it comes to engagement with racial justice in the past six months, 81% of female sports participants and 73% of male sports participants have taken an active role in learning more about race or justice racial by themselves. More than 60% of female and male sports participants said they had conversations with teammates that focused on race or racial justice.

When it comes to commitment to gender equity, 72% of female sport participants and 56% of male sport participants said they actively try to learn about gender equity from themselves. same. Fifty-eight percent of women and 46% of men occasionally or frequently had gender-focused conversations with teammates.

Educational resources

Student-athletes were the most likely to indicate a desire for educational resources on taxation and financial literacy; Career Objective; navigate name, image, and likeness opportunities; and professional opportunities in sport.

Fifty percent of female sport participants and 49% of male sport participants wanted more resources on tax literacy and education.

When it comes to NIL navigation opportunities, 42% of male sport participants and 39% of female sport participants said they wanted more educational resources.

Forty-one percent of male sports participants and 35% of female sports participants surveyed wanted resources regarding career opportunities in their sport.


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Mendocino County Public Health issues seawater advisory for Pudding Creek • The Mendocino Voice | Mendocino County, CAThe Mendocino Voice https://litmus-mme.com/mendocino-county-public-health-issues-seawater-advisory-for-pudding-creek-the-mendocino-voice-mendocino-county-cathe-mendocino-voice/ Sat, 21 May 2022 00:28:41 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/mendocino-county-public-health-issues-seawater-advisory-for-pudding-creek-the-mendocino-voice-mendocino-county-cathe-mendocino-voice/ FORT BRAGG, CALIFORNIA, May 23, 2020 — A handful of people cross the Pudding Creek Bridge in Fort Bragg on Saturday. The beaches in the area were mostly empty and filled with locals only. (Christopher D. Pugh) MENDOCINO Co., 05/20/22 – Mendocino County Public Health has issued a warning to residents to avoid contact with […]]]>

FORT BRAGG, CALIFORNIA, May 23, 2020 — A handful of people cross the Pudding Creek Bridge in Fort Bragg on Saturday. The beaches in the area were mostly empty and filled with locals only. (Christopher D. Pugh)

MENDOCINO Co., 05/20/22 – Mendocino County Public Health has issued a warning to residents to avoid contact with sea water in Pudding Creek to avoid effects on human health. Ocean water failed to meet state standards in testing this week, and “contact with ocean water should be avoided for 50 yards on either side of drainage entering the ‘ocean,’ according to the county environmental health department.

Here is the ad:

Public Notice: Pudding Creek Beach State Ocean Waters Advisory in Fort Bragg.

The Environmental Health Division of Mendocino County Public Health has received bacteriological seawater quality sampling results for the week of May 16, 2022 which indicate that seawater quality at Pudding Creek Beach in Fort Bragg does not meet state standards.

Warning signs were posted at Pudding Creek warning the public to avoid contact with seawater due to increased risk to human health. Contact with sea water should be avoided for 50 meters either side of drainage entering the ocean. Pudding Creek is located along Highway 1 at the north end of Fort Bragg.

Pudding Creek will remain posted with warning signs until water quality meets minimum standards specified by California State regulations. Environmental Health Division staff determine this safety standard based on the bacteriological results of their regular water sampling.

For more information, please contact Marlayna Duley of the Environmental Health Division at 707-234-6625.


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Monkeypox outbreak: Department of Health issues advice, says risk to New Zealand is low https://litmus-mme.com/monkeypox-outbreak-department-of-health-issues-advice-says-risk-to-new-zealand-is-low/ Fri, 20 May 2022 22:33:50 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/monkeypox-outbreak-department-of-health-issues-advice-says-risk-to-new-zealand-is-low/ Health workers use thermal head screening to detect a monkeypox virus on passengers arriving at Soekarno-Hatta Tangerang International Airport near Jakarta, Indonesia. Photo/Getty Images The Department of Health advises anyone who has recently traveled to a country where monkeypox is endemic and who is suffering from a rash-like illness to seek medical attention. The ministry […]]]>

Health workers use thermal head screening to detect a monkeypox virus on passengers arriving at Soekarno-Hatta Tangerang International Airport near Jakarta, Indonesia. Photo/Getty Images

The Department of Health advises anyone who has recently traveled to a country where monkeypox is endemic and who is suffering from a rash-like illness to seek medical attention.

The ministry said there were no suspected cases in New Zealand and it was monitoring the international situation.

The World Health Organization is reportedly calling an emergency meeting to discuss the alarming spread of the monkeypox virus around the world, according to Britain’s Daily Telegraph.

He said the United Nations health authority was bringing together leading experts on the rare disease as a number of new countries announced their first confirmed cases on Friday.

This 1997 image provided by the CDC shows the right arm and torso of a patient whose skin had a number of monkeypox lesions.  Photo/via AP
This 1997 image provided by the CDC shows the right arm and torso of a patient whose skin had a number of monkeypox lesions. Photo/via AP

Eleven countries, including Australia, the United States, Spain and Italy, have now detected monkeypox in the world’s first such outbreak.

A Victorian man is hospitalized after being diagnosed with monkeypox, while another in New South Wales is also suspected of having the virus.

In the UK, the number of monkeypox cases doubled on Friday.

A spokeswoman for the Department of Health told the Herald today that the ESR (Institute of Environmental Science and Research) has assessed the risk of importation into New Zealand as low, but people should be careful s have recently traveled to an area where monkeypox is endemic or epidemic.

On its website, the ministry advised people to seek medical attention if they suffer from a rash-like illness while traveling or upon returning to New Zealand if they have blister-like lesions or sores. on their body.

Travelers to areas where monkeypox is prevalent should wash their hands with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer after contact with infected animals or humans. People should also avoid contact with sick or found dead animals in areas and materials, such as bedding, that have come into contact with a sick animal or person.

The ministry’s website said monkeypox is an animal-to-human virus that is endemic to parts of central and western Africa. It was first identified in humans in 1970 in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows oval-shaped mature monkeypox virions, left, and spherical immature virions, right.  Photo/PA
The electron microscope image made available by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows oval-shaped mature monkeypox virions, left, and spherical immature virions, right. Photo/PA

“Transmission typically occurs from animals to humans via rodents and non-human primate animal reservoirs. Although rare, monkeypox virus can be transmitted from person to person through contact close with skin lesions, bodily fluids, respiratory droplets and contaminated materials such as bedding,” the ministry said.

He said symptoms include fever, malaise, headache and sometimes a sore throat and cough, and swollen lymph nodes. The lesions start in the mouth and spread to the face, arms and legs. The incubation period is usually 6-13 days and monkeypox usually lasts 14-28 days.

The majority of cases in the UK are gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men (MSM).

The New Zealand AIDS Foundation sent out social media posts to the MSM community, advising them on how to recognize monkeypox and low risk in New Zealand.


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6 Mental Health Issues VR Technology Is Already Helping https://litmus-mme.com/6-mental-health-issues-vr-technology-is-already-helping/ Fri, 20 May 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/6-mental-health-issues-vr-technology-is-already-helping/ Virtual Reality (VR) transfers you to different digital worlds, each a landscape for a specific purpose, be it a game or a task. Healthcare also uses technology to treat patients, train staff, and manage day-to-day tasks. Virtual reality particularly benefits psychology. It allows people living with mental health issues to practice coping skills in different […]]]>

Virtual Reality (VR) transfers you to different digital worlds, each a landscape for a specific purpose, be it a game or a task. Healthcare also uses technology to treat patients, train staff, and manage day-to-day tasks.

Virtual reality particularly benefits psychology. It allows people living with mental health issues to practice coping skills in different situations, while improving their mood through fun or productive activities.

Here are the key mental health areas where VR technology is making a difference.


1. Psychosis

Studies over the past few years confirm that virtual reality is helpful in treating various forms of psychosis. In 2020, the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health published a review of it and revealed some interesting findings.

For example, one study used 30 patients with persecutory delusions to compare the effectiveness of virtual reality direct exposure therapy (VRET) versus virtual reality exposure with cognitive behavioral therapy ( VRCBT).

The latter worked better in reducing delusions and helping patients maintain this stability in real life.

Plenty of research like this confirms that immersing patients in realistic yet safe scenarios can help doctors assess them through the VR experience and headset, while alleviating symptoms at the same time.

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Like headsets and software like gameChange improve in terms of comfort and therapeutic processes, it will not be long before healthcare systems fully embrace VR therapy for psychosis.

2. PTSD

But how does virtual reality improve mental health? Treating PTSD with virtual reality, for example, involves creating a simulation for a patient to repeatedly experiment and learn to manage while the doctor monitors each session.

The growing interest in including VR technology in treatments stems from a series of trials and studies that have tested VR exposure therapy as an effective tool in the field of health.

A team reviewed experiments conducted up to 2019 that evaluated the effectiveness of VRET. They published their findings in the European Journal of Psychotraumatology.


When it comes to PTSD, results from 122 participants showed that VR treatment worked better than control groups in reducing symptom severity.

3. Anxiety

The focus on anxiety and the effectiveness of virtual reality in its treatment has also yielded positive results.

A 2021 review of 34 studies published in JMIR Mental Health found that virtual reality can very well support cognitive behavioral therapy when treating anxiety, as well as depression.

Whether treatment takes place alongside VRET or in a virtual environment, the technology allows patients to cope and reduce their anxiety in a place they know is safe.

As already mentioned, exposure therapy in conjunction with virtual reality also allows the patient to repeat the experience if necessary. With software like winphysicians can choose simulations, tailor treatments, and closely examine their client’s responses.


4. Phobias

There are plenty of apps that can help you overcome your fear of rejection or master the dreaded art of public speaking. Phobias, however, can be more complex.

A phobia is a common type of anxiety that can take many forms. Resolving it takes courage and a process that exposes you to your fear and lessens its impact on you.

VR software like Free Thought is already helping, especially when combined with cognitive behavioral therapy. The Anxiety and Mood Disorders Treatment Center lists the main benefits to use this specialized treatment.

Basically, VR exposure therapy lets you challenge yourself from the safety of a doctor’s office while your mind is in an elevator, driving on a busy highway, or in a forest observing snakes.

Although the immersive nature of virtual simulations can always trigger patients, they have the chance to overcome one challenge after another. This builds confidence and strength to break through the debilitating effect of their fears.

A reliable therapist with high-quality software at their fingertips can shape every experience to help people overcome their phobias, but they can also pull the plug if a simulation becomes overwhelming.

5. Depression

Immersion in virtual reality is what sets it apart from normal therapy for mental health issues.

When it comes to depression, it works especially well because it transports patients into environments that are fun, uplifting, or just uplifting. That said, some restraint is important.

A 2019 article published in Psychiatry before discussed how virtual reality could effectively integrate cognitive behavioral therapy techniques for depression.

Its researchers have suggested a combination of low-impact virtual experiences, physical activity and behavioral activation methods, which encourage engagement with the real world, without isolation in a digital world.

As the use of virtual reality in such treatments increases, the number of virtual reality applications for meditation, for example, is also increasing. These types of programs provide calming or pleasantly stimulating experiences that can distract you from your worries.

At the same time, companies like The Overview group apply their VR technology to therapy and remote support. In other words, the base is there, so completely merging virtual reality with depression therapy wouldn’t be a big step forward.

6. Dependency

Addiction is often linked to anxiety and depression, creating a vicious circle of triggers. VR-based therapy can reduce their negative influence and teach you methods to stay calm and confident when cravings strike.

The technology is already being used as an experimental treatment at Recovery Centers of America. He attempts to alleviate anxiety alongside addiction by tailoring virtual environments to each patient’s needs and teaching them ways to deal with stressors in real life.

The immersive nature of the experience makes it highly engaging as the patient completes tasks and practices self-soothing techniques, such as meditation and breath control. Ultimately, the patient should be able to regulate their own emotions and resist triggers.

Although it continues to evolve as a form of mental health treatment, virtual reality is already proving to be a valuable tool in reducing addiction, as well as many of its associated stressors.

Learn more about the place of VR technology in healthcare

Thanks to the innovation of virtual reality, patients and professionals have a safe and productive working environment. As evidence of technology’s usefulness in mental health treatment grows, more and more medical organizations will embrace it.

But processing isn’t the only thing VR is good for. Find out how technology is benefiting other areas of healthcare, from doctor-patient interaction to surgical training.


Doctors in masks on operating table

9 Ways Virtual Reality (VR) Is Improving Healthcare Right Now

Read more



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the pandemic has brought mental health issues “to the forefront” https://litmus-mme.com/the-pandemic-has-brought-mental-health-issues-to-the-forefront/ Fri, 20 May 2022 11:17:51 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/the-pandemic-has-brought-mental-health-issues-to-the-forefront/ They say that laughter is the best medicine. Jessica Holmes, a longtime member of the comedian troupe The Royal Canadian Air Farce, kicked off the conference by sharing her own mental health struggles and ideas on how to stay resilient. She delivered anecdotes alternately hilarious and serious. After the birth of her two children, Holmes […]]]>

They say that laughter is the best medicine. Jessica Holmes, a longtime member of the comedian troupe The Royal Canadian Air Farce, kicked off the conference by sharing her own mental health struggles and ideas on how to stay resilient. She delivered anecdotes alternately hilarious and serious.

After the birth of her two children, Holmes realized that she was so depressed that she couldn’t get out of bed. She joked that her husband’s response was, ‘You relax and unwind. And come down in five minutes and cook us breakfast.

The comedian said depression and burnout can be overcome over time. Exercise is one of the keys to maintaining mental health, she argued. “I would put on my exercise gear and swear to hit the gym and use that membership I bought 14 years ago. Then you sit down and watch TV in your gym clothes.

The conference brought together more than 300 international educators from school districts across the country. Speaker after speaker pointed out that the sector had been hit hard since the start of the pandemic in early 2020.

“I was going to say it’s been a tough two years, but apparently that’s been said before,” joked Randall Martin, chief executive of the British Columbia Council for International Education.

“We take incoming students out of their culture and family support”

He held up a tote bag from the Asia-Pacific Association for International Education conference, which was due to be held in Vancouver in March but was moved online due to the pandemic. “I have 3,000 of these bags to give away,” he said.

Several sessions addressed the issue of student mental health, including identifying issues, offering support and reducing stigma. This is a big concern. Samantha Morneau of Student VIP Insurance says a survey of international students in Canada found that six out of 10 students experience wellness issues. About 30% suffer from a clinical or major depressive disorder. The vast majority of international students feel overwhelmed at some point in their studies.

Daniel To, District Superintendent of Surrey Schools, discussed eating disorders, noting that these are mental health issues, not physical ones. Its aim is that international educators can identify when students are struggling and may need professional help.

“Knowing your students is key,” he argued. He called on educators to understand each student’s cultural background when it comes to food and relate to them as individuals. Then schools should provide support and contact mental health experts if needed.

One of the barriers to helping students with mental health issues is that there is stigma in many countries and cultures. Sometimes parents send a student to Canada, hoping that a “fresh start” will help them overcome their illness. However, students may feel lonely and lack support upon arrival.

“We take incoming students out of their culture and family support and place them in a new environment,” said Mercedes Hayduk of Campbell River Schools International. “We provide them with a supportive environment, but it’s difficult.”

Hayduk noted the importance of educating foster families to notice and raise concerns about mental health. “They are on the front line with students and will be the first to notice behavioral changes.”

She emphasized that it is not necessary to use words like “anxiety” and “depression” with students. This can cause them to become withdrawn and increase mental health stigma. Instead, international educators can ask, “Are you feeling sad lately? »

“We are really happy that the pandemic has brought the problem to the fore”

Several school districts are actively working to provide more services. For example, the Sooke School District held a session to explain that they had hired a health and wellness coordinator to support international students. One of the main objectives: to reduce stigma.

Michael Szabo, emergency physician and medical director at Study Insured, noted that physical symptoms like abdominal pain, headaches and heart palpitations can actually be signs of mental illness and should be treated accordingly.

The fact that many people are struggling during the pandemic has heightened awareness. “We’re really happy that the pandemic has brought the issue to the fore,” Szabo said. “Mental health is health.”

International educators have also faced challenges related to social isolation during Covid. Conference organizers encouraged attendees to ease their worries and enjoy Whistler’s natural beauty by taking walks in the woods or running around local lakes.


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As temperatures rise. workers in the South West face health problems https://litmus-mme.com/as-temperatures-rise-workers-in-the-south-west-face-health-problems/ Thu, 19 May 2022 06:00:06 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/as-temperatures-rise-workers-in-the-south-west-face-health-problems/ Many workers may not realize their health is at risk, according to a new study that examined how extreme heat affects the health of outdoor workers in Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Phoenix, three of the hottest cities. the United States. Photo by Thomas Wolf, foto-tw.de/Wikimedia Commons It’s getting hotter outside due to global warming, […]]]>

Many workers may not realize their health is at risk, according to a new study that examined how extreme heat affects the health of outdoor workers in Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Phoenix, three of the hottest cities. the United States. Photo by Thomas Wolf, foto-tw.de/Wikimedia Commons

It’s getting hotter outside due to global warming, and as a result, outdoor workers in the southwestern states are increasingly vulnerable to heat-related illnesses.

Worse still, many of these workers may not realize that their health is at risk.

That’s the main finding of a new study that looked at how extreme heat affects the health of outdoor workers in Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Phoenix, three of the hottest cities in the United States.

“Heat is not always perceived as a health risk, but this can cause significant problemssaid study author Erick Bandala. He is an assistant research professor of environmental science at the Desert Research Institute in Las Vegas.

“Heat-related illnesses can range from mild headaches, cramps or dehydration to life-threatening heatstroke,” Bandala said.

When researchers compared work-related injury and illness data from 2011 to 2018 with heat index data from Las Vegas, Los Angeles and Phoenix, they found that the increase in heat corresponded to increase in heat-related workplace injuries.

(The Heat Index combines temperature and humidity to measure what heat really feels like to people.)

“Every year we see an increase in heat waves and higher temperatures, and everyone who works outdoors on the streets or in gardens or agriculture is exposed to it,” Bandala said.

According to the study, the average heat indices in Phoenix and Las Vegas went from “extremely cautious” in the summer of 2012 to the “extremely dangerous” range in the summer of 2018.

During this period, the number of non-fatal heat-related occupational injuries and illnesses in each of the three cities has increased steadily, from below the national average in 2011 to above in 2018.

And the more years a person spends working in the heat, the more likely they are to suffer from heat-related illnesses, the study authors said. In severe cases, damage from heat-related illnesses can disrupt the central nervous system, blood clotting mechanisms, and liver and kidney function.

Women may be more vulnerable to certain heat-related conditions than men, including hyponatremiawhich develops when too much plain water is consumed and blood sodium levels become too low, Bandala said.

“Women are more prone to low electrolytes when they drink a lot of plain water, and that can make it worse,” he added. Electrolytes are minerals such as sodium, potassium, and magnesium that dissolve in body fluids.

In March, another study showed an increase in cardiac deaths in the United States related to heat waves.

It’s time to be more proactive in preventing heat-related illnesses, Bandala said. This includes recognizing that you are at risk, drinking water with electrolytes, and taking breaks in cool places.

The study was published online recently in the International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology.

“Extreme heat has gotten so much more extreme and we’re seeing more heat-related illnesses,” said Heidi Brown, associate professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of Arizona College of Public Health in Tucson. .

“We need to improve our ability to manage heat and recognize the challenges that outdoor workers face in places of extreme heat,” said Brown, who was unrelated to the research.

Brown co-leads his county’s participation in a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention program called Building Resilience Against Climate Effects that helps cities address heat issues. His team is currently helping to expand access to cooling centers.

“We are trying to find people who will house cooling centers and open mobile cooling centers that will be there when workers need them,” she said. Cooling centers are air-conditioned sites that are open during hot weather.

“Temperature is not just information, it’s also a warning,” Brown pointed out.

“When it’s hot in Arizona, it’s a trigger to make backup plans, seek shade, use sunscreen, make sure you have enough water, and watch out for other people who might be vulnerable. in extreme heat,” Brown said.

More information

The US National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health offers tips for recognizing and treating heat-related illnesses.

Copyright © 2022 Health Day. All rights reserved.


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Her take: It’s important to be aware of mental health issues | Opinion https://litmus-mme.com/her-take-its-important-to-be-aware-of-mental-health-issues-opinion/ Wed, 18 May 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/her-take-its-important-to-be-aware-of-mental-health-issues-opinion/ I was recently contacted by local ninth graders working on a project to identify community challenges and develop strategies to address them. I don’t know if it was a coincidence, but their focus was on teenage mental illness and May is Mental Health Awareness Month. At any time, it is always important to be aware […]]]>

I was recently contacted by local ninth graders working on a project to identify community challenges and develop strategies to address them. I don’t know if it was a coincidence, but their focus was on teenage mental illness and May is Mental Health Awareness Month.

At any time, it is always important to be aware of the issues related to mental illness. This month’s focus provides a practical backdrop for such conversations. With that in mind, I’ll share my answers to thoughtful questions from Madison, Athziri, and Rylie:

Are cases of mental illness increasing?

Yes, and not just because of the pandemic. Data from the World Health Organization shows that mental illness was on the rise before COVID-19. Mental Health America notes that suicidal ideation among adults in the United States has increased every year since 2011-2012, and growing numbers of young people are suffering from major depression. In 2015, nearly one in 10 young people in Idaho between the ages of 12 and 17 experienced at least one major depressive episode. This figure has nearly doubled since the 2022 report, an increase of more than 14,000 students.

What can make a difference for someone with mental illness?

Recognize that mental illness is a medical condition, for which early diagnosis and appropriate treatment make a difference. Know the signs of mental illness and talk about it without ridicule, judgment or shame to foster an environment where everyone can feel safe seeking support. With half of all chronic mental illnesses beginning at age 14, three-quarters at age 24 (according to the National Institute of Mental Health), this is essential for young people and those who are s take care of them and work with them.

What is the National Alliance on Mental Illness, or NAMI, doing to address this issue in Idaho?

NAMI educates, advocates and provides support for people with mental illness and those who care for them. We offer in-person and virtual classes for individuals and families, and host support groups across the state where participants can share, learn, and feel less isolated in complete confidentiality. We advocate for policies that support people with mental illness and reduce stigma.

What is your biggest challenge?

Some might think it’s the lack of access to resources in our rural state, or the cost of treatment. I think it’s the need to change the way we think about mental illness.

Education improves our understanding and awareness, prompting a more effective approach to dealing with it.

When a parent realizes that anxiety or depression is the cause of a young person’s defiance or inability to get out of bed, they can ask for help rather than punishing them for their defiance or laziness.

When an employer recognizes the signs of mental illness in the workplace, they can provide accommodation, address burnout, and provide benefits including employee assistance programs and insurance coverage. for mental health care.

When we collectively recognize the prevalence of mental illness and its impact, we encourage lawmakers to make policy decisions that reduce harm to people with mental illness and fund mental health care programs.

Awareness and education lead to action. That’s why we have Mental Health Awareness Month.

What are others doing to help? Learn about mental illness. Volunteer and contribute to organizations that work to educate and support people who have it.

Understand that mental illness is a medical condition for which there is a treatment.

Believe that healing is possible. Listen with compassion and share your own challenges to normalizing mental health conversations.

And finally, do you think the problem will improve?

Absolutely. If we are willing to educate ourselves, fight stigma, and seek support for ourselves and our loved ones, we can all make a difference in Idaho.

Markley is the executive director of NAMI Idaho, the state organization of the National Alliance on Mental Illness.


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Student leaders respond to need to focus on mental health issues | News https://litmus-mme.com/student-leaders-respond-to-need-to-focus-on-mental-health-issues-news/ Tue, 17 May 2022 19:32:00 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/student-leaders-respond-to-need-to-focus-on-mental-health-issues-news/ By Christina Amano Dolan Editor Members of the Superintendent’s High School Student Advisory Committee were spotlighted at the Hanover School Board meeting last week, highlighting how young students have served as powerful voices to their peers over the years and spurred significant changes in their leadership roles. Dr. Bob Staley, Director of Secondary Education and […]]]>

By Christina Amano Dolan Editor

Members of the Superintendent’s High School Student Advisory Committee were spotlighted at the Hanover School Board meeting last week, highlighting how young students have served as powerful voices to their peers over the years and spurred significant changes in their leadership roles.

Dr. Bob Staley, Director of Secondary Education and Panel Leader, provided an overview of the group and what participants have accomplished over the years.

Established in 1997, the High School Student Advisory Council is made up of student representatives from every grade level in every middle school and high school in the county, including two students from Georgetown School, two from the Hanover Center for Trades and Technology and seven from the County of Hannover Online School.

Students are handpicked by their respective directors to sit on the panel on behalf of their peers. The panel currently has 36 students who remain on the panel until graduation.

The group typically meets several times a year with Superintendent Michael Gill and consults with senior staff and central office leaders to determine areas of focus. Student responses are shared with principals after each meeting with an annual report provided to the school board in June.

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“When students talk, we listen,” said Staley, who described the focus areas they’ve been diving into this school year, including student devices and technology, lunch menus, scheduling, flexible learning days, the need for a school counselor or guidance counselors, and reporting. bullying behaviors.

Due to complications with COVID-19 restrictions, the panel has only met with Gill twice this school year. He said he looks forward to a “more robust” schedule as they get back to normal.

Several panel members stood alongside Staley during the meeting to share their experience on the panel and offer suggestions for the upcoming school year. Zane Abbud from Atlee High School, Suzanne Donaldson from Atlee High School, Christopher DeCambre from Mechanicsville High School and Mia Walker from Patrick Henry High School were in attendance.

Abbud thanked Gill, Atlee Secondary School Principal John Wheeler and the school board for giving him the opportunity to be on the panel and listen to their ideas, suggestions and feedback. He has served on the jury since his freshman year.

“One thing I would like to share with you tonight is that given our experience working with so many fabulous people here in this same room, Hanover County is really listening to us as students,” Abbud said.

Donaldson, who has been on the panel since sixth grade, shared the positive relationships she has established over the years as a student leader, including her strengthened relationship with Wheeler and her former principal Mark Beckett of Chickahominy Middle School.

“It was also great to get to know some of the school board members personally, but more importantly, being able to collaborate with students outside of my high school was a great opportunity,” Donaldson said.

Sophomore Walker has been on the panel since her freshman year. She said the advisory committee is a great opportunity to hear first-hand from students what is happening in schools and stressed the importance of focusing on student mental health.

“I would encourage division leadership to continue to focus on mental health,” Walker said. “…Poor mental health is a major killer of adolescents. This is a serious subject, and we can solve it by making the environment safe and student-friendly. »

Gill said the topic of mental health came up in every group during the last panel meeting.

“It’s important for our young people, who we continue to focus on,” Gill said. “So I want to thank our students for acknowledging that, for talking about it very candidly, which we know will lead to progress.”

Chickahominy board representative Bob Hundley suggested the panel explore further ideas for tackling bullying in schools and how it intersects with mental health.

“Because this is a situation that’s been going on for as long as there have been students, and I don’t think we’ll ever be able to deal with it all at once,” Hundley said. “But I think with input from students like you, I think we can make a big difference.”

Disciplinary Hearings Review Officer Dr. Brian Maltby reviewed the 2021-2022 Equity Report and discussed the topic of mental and behavioral health in schools in more detail, drawing attention to a recent increased suicide assessments conducted by school counsellors.

According to the report, 294 assessments were conducted in the 2019-2020 school year, which included data only up to March 13, 2020, due to COVID-19 related school closures. In the 2020-2021 school year, the ratings dropped to 159, which may be partly due to virtual learning instead of in-person instruction. In the current school year, ratings have risen to 295 as of May 1.

“The numbers are high, the need for mental health resources…is clear,” Maltby said. “They are still an important part of our children’s school day.”

The report also identified a trend with many students reporting feeling tired, anxious and worried. A majority of the same students reported having access to coping skills or a trusted adult to turn to for help.

Maltby said he had the privilege of working closely with the Secondary Student Advisory Committee to identify the need for mental health resources in schools and highlighted the resources they have allocated to support mental health and behavioral.

“The highlight this year is not so much the technology resources as what we’re doing to help with mental health and behavior in our schools,” Maltby said. “And I can tell you we’ve had some amazing successes.”

Resources now available to students include five therapy dogs in schools, new social workers, positive behavior support coaches, elementary counselors, school mental health clinicians, ABA behavior advisory teachers, a new guidance counsellor, a positive behavior support coordinator and a new intervention counsellor. for the prevention of drug addiction.

When asked what the biggest benefit of being on the panel was, Walker said she enjoyed the character building aspect. Donaldson said it helped her come out of her shell, and DeCambre said he enjoys public speaking and having important conversations with adults. Abbud said he liked learning how to make changes.

“Schools won’t be perfect,” Abbud said. “…So to be able to kind of help bring about that change, to see how that change is created, and then to communicate that to the people that I represent, I think that was probably the biggest benefit for me.”


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Addressing Employee Burnout and Mental Health Issues | https://litmus-mme.com/addressing-employee-burnout-and-mental-health-issues/ Tue, 17 May 2022 13:15:05 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/addressing-employee-burnout-and-mental-health-issues/ Employee support is essential for a loyal, satisfied and productive workforce. “No news here, we know these are unprecedented times,” Teresa Bucello, partner and health practice leader at Mercer Connecticut, told an audience of 130 business leaders at the CBIA conference in May 10 Healthcare’s Future: The Post-COVID World at Rocky Hill. Mercer partner Teresa […]]]>

Employee support is essential for a loyal, satisfied and productive workforce.

“No news here, we know these are unprecedented times,” Teresa Bucello, partner and health practice leader at Mercer Connecticut, told an audience of 130 business leaders at the CBIA conference in May 10 Healthcare’s Future: The Post-COVID World at Rocky Hill.

Mercer partner Teresa Bucello speaking at the AABC healthcare conference on May 10.

“The talent market is heating up and unfortunately the number of job openings in the United States has grown to a staggering 11.5 million.

“American workers are leaving at unprecedented levels. We have drop rates at 3% for March 2022, which is back to the highs we saw in November. »

Bucello detailed the main reasons for employee fatigue and offered solutions for employers.

‘Exhausted’

She attributed the record number of resignations to a change in employee needs.

“Seventy-seven percent of employees say they feel burnt out,” she said, “and more than 91 percent say stress has impacted the quality of their work.

“We have to demonstrate to our employees that we listen to their needs, that we care about them.”

Mercer’s Teresa Bucello

Bucello said employee struggles hurt businesses because “it’s our productivity, it’s our business, it’s our bottom line, it’s the care we provide to patients.”

The solution, she added, was to listen to employees and provide them with what they need for a productive work environment.

“We need to demonstrate to our employees that we listen to their needs, care about them and are committed to supporting them,” she said.

Main issues

Citing a joint Mercer survey of employees, Bucello pointed to some of the biggest issues for low-wage and high-wage workers.

The main concerns of low-wage workers were making ends meet, physical and mental health, and financial well-being, including retirement and debt.

“It’s hard to think about your future, plan your retirement and plan for your children’s education when you can’t pay your monthly bills,” she said.

“But this group is not lost. It is something they are concerned about.”

The main concerns of high-wage workers were health, work-life balance, and personal fulfillment and purpose.

Solution approach

Bucello stressed that in trying to address these issues, it is crucial to consider each person as an individual, instead of focusing on one aspect of themselves, such as their income level or where they live.

“Supported employees are more loyal to their employer, they are more productive at work, they lead healthier lifestyles and they are happier,” Bucello said.

“Supported employees are more loyal to their employer, they are more productive.”

bucello

“But not every employer will be in a position to want to dig this deep and be able to look at it on an individual basis or even in groups with personalities.

“That doesn’t mean you can’t create a meaningful program to support your employee population, better engage them, and drive satisfaction and loyalty forward.”

Bucello highlighted three policies highly valued by employees: flexible work arrangements, time off during the workday to focus on health and wellness appointments, and the ability to customize benefits. social services to meet their personal needs.

Mental health support

Additionally, Bucello said nearly half of all employees surveyed valued a wide range of mental health support, with reduced costs for mental health treatment topping the list.

The survey also showed the benefits of employer support for employees.

Among employees who said they received good or very good support during the pandemic, 45% said they were less likely to leave their job because of this support, compared to only 24% who received fair or very good support. poor.

And of those who said they received good or very good support, 71% said they felt energized at work, compared to just 39% who received fair or poor support.

“The employer’s support is important, it also earns loyalty and it works,” Bucello said.

“Your employees react to how they feel from their employer.”

Key actions

Bucello concluded by outlining four key actions employers can take to navigate the competitive job market and make employees feel valued.

The first consists of identifying and prioritizing the population most at risk of leaving.

The second is to take steps to mitigate burnout and support employee mental health.

Third, create a psychologically safe and inclusive workplace that embraces diversity.

“Make sure people feel safe.”

bucello

“Make sure people feel safe,” Bucello said.

“Not just their benefits programs, but the culture within the organization says, ‘I’m a safe place for you to come to work and voice your concerns. “”

The fourth and final action is to continue to provide flexibility during the pandemic and beyond.

“We have to start changing in order to attract and retain,” Bucello said.

“It’s not an easy undertaking,” she continued, “but it’s important, and it matters.”


Healthcare’s Future: The Post-COVID World was made possible through the generous support of JPMorgan Chase Bank and additional support from Deloitte and Pullman & Comley.


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Advice on health issues from Maryland department in light of infant formula shortage – CBS Baltimore https://litmus-mme.com/advice-on-health-issues-from-maryland-department-in-light-of-infant-formula-shortage-cbs-baltimore/ Mon, 16 May 2022 19:18:00 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/advice-on-health-issues-from-maryland-department-in-light-of-infant-formula-shortage-cbs-baltimore/ BALTIMORE (WJZ) – In the face of a nationwide shortage of infant formula, the Maryland Department of Health is advising families to stay in close contact with their child’s healthcare provider and to help residents see if they are eligible for extended WIC benefits. Across the country, more than 40% of top-selling formulas are out […]]]>

BALTIMORE (WJZ) – In the face of a nationwide shortage of infant formula, the Maryland Department of Health is advising families to stay in close contact with their child’s healthcare provider and to help residents see if they are eligible for extended WIC benefits.

Across the country, more than 40% of top-selling formulas are out of stock after manufacturer Abbott was forced to close a factory linked to several hospitalizations of infants, including two deaths.

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“MDH is working with federal, state, local and community partners to ensure Maryland families with newborns and infants have the information they need about options during this nationwide formula shortage and recent recalls. “said Health Secretary Dennis Schrader. “We will continue to monitor all aspects of the infant formula shortage and encourage families to access the many resources available to stay up to date.”

Abbott recalled three popular brands of powdered infant formula in February due to four complaints of the common environmental bacteria Cronobacter sakazakii.

In light of the resulting shortages, the Maryland Department of Health is urging residents not to dilute formulas or use homemade formulas.

“If you feed a baby breast milk from a source other than the baby’s mother, you should only use milk from a source that has selected its milk donors and taken other precautions to ensure the milk safety,” the agency said.

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It’s okay to switch to another brand if available, and parents whose babies need special formula should consult their child’s pediatrician about comparable brands, the department said.

Anyone who cannot find a specialty formula can use the following resources:

WIC participants should contact their local office for assistance in finding the plan or making changes to their benefits. Residents of Maryland wishing to enroll in the program may visit the Maryland WIC website or call 1-800-242-4942 to find out if they are eligible.

The program has expanded the allowable sizes, brands and formula types available to enrollees.

The department has also published several breastfeeding resources:

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“During this difficult time, we encourage families struggling to find formula to contact their child’s primary health care provider,” said Dr. Debbie Badawi, president of the American Academy of Pediatrics of Maryland. . “Your local pediatric health care providers can help you during this time. The Maryland Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics has worked with pediatricians in Maryland to ensure they are aware of possible resources. We also remind families never to dilute your formula as this could make your baby very sick.


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