Health education – Litmus MME http://litmus-mme.com/ Sun, 22 May 2022 04:06:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9 https://litmus-mme.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/lit-120x120.png Health education – Litmus MME http://litmus-mme.com/ 32 32 Ontario Election: Petersen — “A Strong Advocate for Sexual Health Education, Informed Consent and Healthy Relationships” https://litmus-mme.com/ontario-election-petersen-a-strong-advocate-for-sexual-health-education-informed-consent-and-healthy-relationships/ Fri, 20 May 2022 11:40:10 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/ontario-election-petersen-a-strong-advocate-for-sexual-health-education-informed-consent-and-healthy-relationships/ Breadcrumb Links Opinion Ontario election Columnists The Citizen invited local candidates in the June 2 election to tell voters what they hope to do for the riding if elected. Today: Michelle Petersen, Green Party candidate for Orléans. Michelle Petersen is the Green Party candidate in Orleans. .jpg Content of the article The Citizen has invited […]]]>

The Citizen invited local candidates in the June 2 election to tell voters what they hope to do for the riding if elected. Today: Michelle Petersen, Green Party candidate for Orléans.

Content of the article

The Citizen has invited local candidates in Ontario’s June 2 election to tell voters what they hope to do specifically for their riding if elected. Several responded before our deadline, and we are happy to share the arguments of those who did. Today: Candidate of the Green Party of Orléans Michelle Peterson:

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As a young woman, I was not interested in politics at all. I found it boring! I didn’t see the point of it for me. It was only when I joined a francophone and feminist work environment, at the francophone CALACS (Center for Assistance and Fight against Sexual Assault) in Ottawa, that I realized: the personal is political , a phrase first coined by American feminist Carol Hanisch in 1970.

The people we elect determine the social context in which we live. They create laws that structure the society in which we live on a daily basis. They hold enormous power. After witnessing the flaws in the system time and time again, I realized that if I wanted change, those in power had to get involved and follow the leadership of the communities most affected. That’s why I’m a strong advocate for representation that reflects the true diversity of our communities — in politics, in education, in the media, everywhere!

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When I learned about the demonstrations of the dress code at the Béatrice Desloges Catholic high school, I was proud to see students who did not accept this unfair treatment in their school, their daily living environment. After the #MeToo movement, many of us are no longer willing to tolerate patriarchal rulers who choose to limit our freedom rather than hold accountable the systems that perpetuate sexism, misogyny, gender inequality, cultural rape and, ultimately, all gender-based violence.

Is the popular belief still that cropped shorts and tank tops with bikini straps are eye-catching and… what? Distract? Seduce? Cause attacks? Seriously?!

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What will it take for those in authority to understand? When we teach young women that it’s up to them not to dress too sexy, we also normalize and we teach young men to judge, to sexualize, to objectify their peers. A harmful message is then taught and validated: “If she dresses like that, it’s to seduce you.

That’s enough! It is high time that women dress as they wish without fearing for their physical, sexual, emotional and psychological safety!

Rather than imposing archaic and sexist rules, consider creating a learning environment where all your students are safe and free.

If elected, I will be a strong advocate for sexual health education, sexual and reproductive health and rights, informed consent, and healthy relationships.

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Let’s offer young people the opportunity to reflect and develop their own analysis of privilege and power dynamics so that they can continue to build a more just and equitable world for themselves and for all.

Biography: Michelle Petersen is the Green Party candidate in Orleans. She is a former psychotherapist and is currently Director of Operations at Action ontarienne contre la violence contre la femmes, the provincial coalition of francophone and feminist services for victims and survivors of gender-based violence.

READ THE PROFILES OF OTHER CANDIDATES IN THIS COUNTY

Election in Ontario: Bourdon — “A strong Franco-Ontarian voice at Queen’s Park”

Election in Ontario: Blais — “A community champion who has always fought for you”

Ontario Election: Felián — “For too long, the people of Ottawa have been stuck in an impasse”

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Ministries of Health, Education and PEMA Announce Governor’s Awards of Excellence Recipients https://litmus-mme.com/ministries-of-health-education-and-pema-announce-governors-awards-of-excellence-recipients/ Fri, 20 May 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/ministries-of-health-education-and-pema-announce-governors-awards-of-excellence-recipients/ Harrisburg –Governor Tom Wolf on Thursday announced the recipients of the Governor’s Achievement Awards, which include a multi-agency award for staff from the Pennsylvania Departments of Health, Education, and Emergency Management Agency for having organized targeted vaccination sites to vaccinate 112,565 teachers and school support staff in an unprecedented period of 20 days. Individual members […]]]>

Harrisburg –Governor Tom Wolf on Thursday announced the recipients of the Governor’s Achievement Awards, which include a multi-agency award for staff from the Pennsylvania Departments of Health, Education, and Emergency Management Agency for having organized targeted vaccination sites to vaccinate 112,565 teachers and school support staff in an unprecedented period of 20 days.

Individual members of the award-winning agencies include Director of Nursing, Office of Community Health Systems Jennifer Shirk (DOH); Kira Lemmons (PEMA), Public Safety Education and Awareness Specialist; and Kari Worley Special Advisor to the Secretary (PDE).

“This inter-agency collaboration of more than 200 dedicated staff was able to vaccinate teachers and support staff quickly and efficiently, resulting in a return to a safe in-person school environment,” the Secretary said. Acting Health, Dr. Denise Johnson. . “This operation shows how effectively and efficiently state agencies can work to improve the lives of Pennsylvanians.”

Through the DOH, public and private K-12 educational and support personnel had the opportunity to receive COVID-19 vaccines early in the vaccine rollout, when it was difficult to find and schedule appointments.

Within 20 days, the team worked with the Intermediate Unit’s unified educational and support staff coordination group to establish a concept of operations that coordinated vaccine distribution, transportation, daily security, management of cold chain and dose administration.






PEMA supported the DOH and coordinated the efforts of multiple entities, including state and county agencies, nonprofit organizations, and the private sector. PDE was responsible for organizing the 28 IU vaccination sites. Multi-agency collaboration succeeded in preparing sites by arranging work schedules, staffing, training, scheduling vaccine appointments and ensuring safety precautions were followed, all of which enabled a rapid, coordinated and effective response.

“Thanks to the tireless efforts of these Commonwealth employees who worked many late hours and weekends to get the job done, our students were able to return to their classrooms,” Acting Education Secretary Eric said. Hagarty. “These employees exemplify a dedication and passion for their work that goes beyond the scope of their duties and helps make Pennsylvania a safer place to live.”

“The success of this statewide mission demonstrates the expertise and teamwork that is essential to overcoming logistical challenges in a short 20-day deployment,” said PEMA Director Randy Padfield. . “This operation is a great example of how state agencies can work together to implement critical, responsive operations to keep Pennsylvanians safe.”

The Governor’s Awards of Excellence recognize Commonwealth employees for exemplary work performance or service that reflects initiative, leadership, innovation and/or increased efficiency. A total of 50 employees from 12 agencies received awards for their achievements in 2021.


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Departments of Health, Education and PEMA Announce Governor’s Achievement Award Recipients https://litmus-mme.com/departments-of-health-education-and-pema-announce-governors-achievement-award-recipients/ Thu, 19 May 2022 19:55:11 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/departments-of-health-education-and-pema-announce-governors-achievement-award-recipients/ Harrisburg, Pennsylvania – Governor Tom Wolf today announced the recipients of the Governor’s Awards of Excellence, which include a multi-agency award for staff from the Departments of Health, Education and the United States Emergency Management Agency. Pennsylvania for hosting targeted vaccination sites to vaccinate 112,565 teachers and school support staff in an unprecedented 20 days. […]]]>

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania – Governor Tom Wolf today announced the recipients of the Governor’s Awards of Excellence, which include a multi-agency award for staff from the Departments of Health, Education and the United States Emergency Management Agency. Pennsylvania for hosting targeted vaccination sites to vaccinate 112,565 teachers and school support staff in an unprecedented 20 days.

Individual members of the award-winning agencies include Director of Nursing, Office of Community Health Systems Jennifer Shirk (DOH); Kira Lemmons (PEMA), Public Safety Education and Awareness Specialist; and Kari Worley Special Advisor to the Secretary (PDE).

“This inter-agency collaboration of more than 200 dedicated staff was able to vaccinate teachers and support staff quickly and efficiently, resulting in a return to a safe in-person school environment,” the Secretary said. Acting Health, Dr. Denise Johnson. . “This operation shows how effectively and efficiently state agencies can work to improve the lives of Pennsylvanians.”

Through the DOH, public and private K-12 educational and support personnel had the opportunity to receive COVID-19 vaccines early in the vaccine rollout, when it was difficult to find and schedule appointments.

Within 20 days, the team worked with the Intermediate Unit’s unified educational and support staff coordination group to establish a concept of operations that coordinated vaccine distribution, transportation, daily security, management of cold chain and dose administration.

PEMA supported the DOH and coordinated the efforts of multiple entities, including state and county agencies, nonprofit organizations, and the private sector. PDE was responsible for organizing the 28 IU vaccination sites. Multi-agency collaboration succeeded in preparing sites by arranging work schedules, staffing, training, scheduling vaccine appointments and ensuring safety precautions were followed, all of which enabled a rapid, coordinated and effective response.

“Thanks to the tireless efforts of these Commonwealth employees who worked many late hours and weekends to get the job done, our students were able to return to their classrooms,” Acting Education Secretary Eric said. Hagarty. “These employees exemplify a dedication and passion for their work that goes beyond the scope of their duties and helps make Pennsylvania a safer place to live.”

“The success of this statewide mission demonstrates the expertise and teamwork that is essential to overcoming logistical challenges in a short 20-day deployment,” said PEMA Director Randy Padfield. . “This operation is a great example of how state agencies can work together to implement critical, responsive operations to keep Pennsylvanians safe.”

The Governor’s Awards of Excellence recognize Commonwealth employees for exemplary work performance or service that reflects initiative, leadership, innovation and/or increased efficiency. A total of 50 employees from 12 agencies received awards for their achievements in 2021.

MEDIA CONTACT:

Mark O’Neill, DOH – ra-dhpressoffice@pa.gov

Kendall Alexander, PDE – kealexand@pa.gov

L. Paul Vezzetii, PEMA – lvezzetti@pa.gov

# # #


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Iringa bets on reproductive health education to curb teenage pregnancy https://litmus-mme.com/iringa-bets-on-reproductive-health-education-to-curb-teenage-pregnancy/ Wed, 18 May 2022 05:22:37 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/iringa-bets-on-reproductive-health-education-to-curb-teenage-pregnancy/ This was stated recently during a brainstorming workshop on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and services for peer educators organized by SOS Children’s Villages Tanzania in collaboration with Iringa Municipality. They said education will help reduce teen pregnancy as well as risky behaviors when high school students engage in sexual activity at an […]]]>

This was stated recently during a brainstorming workshop on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and services for peer educators organized by SOS Children’s Villages Tanzania in collaboration with Iringa Municipality.

They said education will help reduce teen pregnancy as well as risky behaviors when high school students engage in sexual activity at an early age.

They said the education they received enabled them to go and teach their peers in schools highlighting the dangers of having sex at an early age.

Faraja Lugenge, a student from Mawelewele Secondary School in Iringa Township, said she came to study for the second time but also came back to give her feedback on what she taught to her classmates about reproductive health education.

“The training was successful in reducing the number of female students becoming pregnant at an early age as well as stopping risky behavior…” she said.

Lugenge said the life skills and reproductive health education provided by SOS in collaboration with the government, gave them the confidence to reduce the risk of bad behavior.

Herman Mjengi, program officer for the Children with Children (CwC) project implemented by SOS Children’s Villages Tanzania in the Iringa region, said the main objective of the project was to promote the well-being of young people. local women and men.

“Today we are in a workshop as a continuation of close cooperation with the government to ensure child welfare and also to assess reproductive health activities in schools,” he said. added.

Mjengi explained that they have already trained students who are peer educators of schools to learn skills on life skills and reproductive health education as well as boss teachers and matrones in schools, so that together , they can have an impact on the knowledge of their peers.

“We believe education can help their peers because they have been able to adapt to build their ability to avoid risky behaviors and have accurate information,” he said.

Correct information includes reproductive health education and the need to educate their peers at school to emphasize SOS’ prevention priority.

“We have two priorities, the first is to prevent and the second is to respond to those who have already been victimized in the community, who have had young children.”

Mjengi explained that it is also necessary to achieve objectives, and recognizing that the institution that brings together the most people is the school.

But the problem will persist if we do not put in place a mechanism to ensure that others do not become victims again.

“We saw that the institution that brings most young people together are schools and saw the need to empower some students to empower their fellow students on the right reproductive health education issues, so they can make the right decisions,” Mjengi said.

Peer educators will be given new materials and will be swept away because in the past they had no knowledge of the reproductive health curriculum in schools.

When we started the project, most people and the community as a whole were unaware of child rights awareness and child protection issues.

“For us as SOS, we have focused on holding public meetings to raise awareness about the rights and welfare of children. “

To a large extent they did, for example, comparing it to the current situation and at the beginning society did not have enough understanding, but now society understands.

But since we started last year in September until now, we have been able to significantly reduce teenage pregnancies, children speak openly and broadly in the context of reproductive health.

We thank the government and other child protection stakeholders for developing the project to achieve more ambitious goals.

Tiniel Mmbaga, Social Welfare Officer at Iringa Council, said it was true that the problem of children with children in Iringa Municipality was serious.

“I would like to thank our partner SOS Children’s Village Tanzania, which we are on the board of Iringa, who are rolling out the project for the children,” said Mmbaga.

She noted that before starting to implement the project, they conducted a baseline survey in which they found that the challenge of children in the municipality was huge, so they proposed the project.

The project operates in two main areas, the first of which is to help young people who are in school so that they do not fall into the category of children with children.

In the sense that female students who then continue their studies should not become pregnant at a young age and enter into another caregiving role (parenting).

But the second area is providing tailored care to those who have already had children, they make sure they get an education to help raise their children by providing them with basic services, says Mmbaga.

“But in line with that, as we know, after girls get pregnant, they drop out of school and take on the responsibility of parenthood.”

Thus, SOS, through the project for children with children, proposed a program to strengthen their capacities in entrepreneurship in order to empower them economically since they are no longer in the education system.

She said entrepreneurship education aims to empower girls so that they can provide basic services to their children, after having no business due to dropping out of school due to pregnancy.

Steven Ngwale is the Acting Director of Iringa Municipality; he thanked the non-governmental organization SOS for the implementation of this project (CwC), which is implemented for three years from 2021 to 2023.

The project aims to provide life skills and reproductive health education to children aged 10-19.

Ngwale said the main aim was to prevent young people from getting pregnant at an early age by girls and for boys not to engage in risky behaviors.

The project is implemented in four schools in the municipality of Iringa, namely Kihesa, Tagamenda, Ipogolo and Mawelewele, providing training to peer educators on life skills.

Peer educators receive reproductive health education to address the problem of teenage pregnancies, with the aim of sustaining the project after donors leave.


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Employment as Associate Lecturer in Rural Mental Health Education with UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE https://litmus-mme.com/employment-as-associate-lecturer-in-rural-mental-health-education-with-university-of-melbourne/ Fri, 13 May 2022 11:48:45 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/employment-as-associate-lecturer-in-rural-mental-health-education-with-university-of-melbourne/ Location: Wangaratta Role Type: Full time (part time negotiable); CDD until December 2023 Faculty: Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences Department/School: Rural Health Department Salary: A-level – $75,289 – $102,163 per year plus 17% super Founded in 1853, the University of Melbourne is Australia’s No. 1 university and is consistently ranked among the […]]]>

Location: Wangaratta

Role Type: Full time (part time negotiable); CDD until December 2023

Faculty: Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences

Department/School: Rural Health Department

Salary: A-level$75,289 – $102,163 per year plus 17% super

Founded in 1853, the University of Melbourne is Australia’s No. 1 university and is consistently ranked among the top universities in the world. We are proud of our staff, our commitment to excellence in research and teaching, and our global engagement.

About the Department of Rural Health

The Department of Rural Health is a department of Melbourne Medical School, University of Melbourne. The department is based in Shepparton, Ballarat, Bendigo (in partnership with Monash University and La Trobe University) and Wangaratta and has associations with over 40 small rural towns in Victoria.

The Department of Rural Health is a rural health training program aimed at supporting, improving and increasing the recruitment, retention and quality of the rural health workforce in Victoria. This position is available in the University Department of Rural Health (UDRH) program which supports internships for nursing and allied health students, provides training in Indigenous health, and undertakes research in rural health.

About the role

UDRH is seeking an educator to develop, support and teach in rural mental health and wellbeing student community placements for its newly funded project, Mental Health and Wellbeing for Remote and Indigenous Victorians. The role operates from an interprofessional service-learning model to support and educate students to deliver rural mental health promotion, prevention and early intervention in grassroots community groups in areas more rural parts of North East Victoria. The position is funded as part of a larger project in rural Victoria focusing on student placements in mental health and wellbeing.

In a typical week at work, you can:

  • Develop interprofessional service-learning placements in wellness and mental health and wellness promotion, prevention and early intervention in rural communities east of Wangaratta.
  • Provide student orientation and facilitate mental health and wellbeing education for students to prepare them to provide tailored mental health and wellbeing promotion, prevention and early intervention with specific groups in rural communities.
  • Recruit and manage casual supervisors for specific student placements, train supervisors for service-learning placements, and ensure supervisors focus on student learning needs.
  • Ensure that internships are evaluated by students, supervisors, participants and other stakeholders.

Please note that job sharing is possible, so if you are interested in this position but would like to work part-time, please apply.

About you

You are a confident communicator with high-level interpersonal skills and the ability to develop and maintain strong partnerships with community organizations, health services and community stakeholders in rural communities.

Ideally, you will also have:

  • Advanced degree in nursing, paramedic, community development or similar discipline
  • Demonstrated experience in developing partnerships with stakeholders in a rural community setting
  • Experience teaching mental health and wellbeing at tertiary level
  • Experience supporting and supervising internships and student internships
  • Knowledge of current evidence and research on rural labor issues in Australia

To ensure that the University continues to provide a safe environment for all, this position requires the incumbent to hold an up-to-date and valid working with children verification.

Benefits of working with us

In addition to having the opportunity to grow and meet challenges, and to be part of a vibrant campus life, our employees enjoy a range of rewarding benefits:

  • Flexible work arrangements and generous personal, parental and cultural leaves
  • Competitive remuneration, 17% super, salary package and leave loading
  • Free and subsidized health and wellness services, and access to fitness and cultural clubs
  • Discounts on a wide range of products and services, including Myki and Qantas Club cards
  • Career development opportunities and 25% off graduate courses for staff and their immediate families

To learn more, please visit https://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/staff-benefits.

Be yourself

At UoM, we value the unique backgrounds, experiences and contributions each person brings to our community, and we encourage and celebrate diversity. Indigenous Australians, those who identify as LGBTQIA+, women, people of all ages with disabilities and from diverse cultures are encouraged to apply for our roles. Our goal is to create a workforce that reflects the community in which we live.

Join us!

If you think this role is right for you, please submit your application, including a brief cover letter, your resume, and your responses to the selection criteria^ (found in the job description) for the role.

For information to help you compile short statements to meet the selection criteria and competencies, please see http://about.unimelb.edu.au/careers/selection-criteria

If you require reasonable adjustments with the recruitment process, please contact the Talent Acquisition team at hr-talent@unimelb.edu.au.

Due to the impacts of COVID-19, we are currently prioritizing applicants with valid work rights in Australia and applicants who are not affected by travel restrictions. Please see the latest updates to Australia’s immigration and border provisions: https://covid19.homeaffairs.gov.au/

The University of Melbourne is required to comply with applicable health guidelines and directives issued by the Victorian Minister of Health. The University of Melbourne requires all University of Melbourne employees to be fully immunized against COVID-19 unless an exemption order applies. All applicants must therefore meet this requirement when submitting an application.

Job Description : 0056025 Associate Lecturer in Rural Mental Health Education PD.pdf

Closing of applications: June 02, 2022 11:55 PM AUS Eastern Standard Time


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Consumption-related health education inequalities in COVID-19: a cross-sectional study in China https://litmus-mme.com/consumption-related-health-education-inequalities-in-covid-19-a-cross-sectional-study-in-china/ Fri, 13 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/consumption-related-health-education-inequalities-in-covid-19-a-cross-sectional-study-in-china/ This article was originally published here Before Public Health. 2022 Apr 25;10:810488. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2022.810488. eCollection 2022. ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is influencing various aspects of society, especially for people of low socioeconomic status. Health education has proven to be an essential strategy to prevent a pandemic. However, socioeconomic characteristics may limit health education among […]]]>

This article was originally published here

Before Public Health. 2022 Apr 25;10:810488. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2022.810488. eCollection 2022.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is influencing various aspects of society, especially for people of low socioeconomic status. Health education has proven to be an essential strategy to prevent a pandemic. However, socioeconomic characteristics may limit health education among low socioeconomic status groups. This study explores consumption-related health education inequalities and contributing factors that are variable across China during COVID-19.

METHODS: The 2020 China COVID-19 Survey is a cross-sectional study in China, based on an anonymous online survey of 7,715 samples in 85 cities. He used machine learning methods to assess household consumption and other contributing variables associated with health education during the pandemic. The concentration index (CI) and the horizontal index (HI) were used to measure consumption-related inequalities in health education, respectively. Additionally, Wagstaff decomposition analysis was used to identify other variables contributing to health education inequality.

RESULTS: The result indicates that participants with more education, better income, and positive consumption preferences undertake higher health education during COVID-19. The CI and HI of the consumption-health education inequality are 0.0321 (P < 0.001) and 0.0416 (p < 0.001), respectively, indicating that health education is concentrated in wealthy groups. We adapted Lasso regression to solve problems and omit variables. In terms of other socioeconomic characteristics, annual income was also a major contributor to inequalities in health education, accounting for 27.1% (P < 0.001). Empirical results also suggest that education, health status, identification, residency, and health insurance contribute to health education inequality.

CONCLUSIONS: Difference in household consumption, annual income, rural-urban disparity, and private health insurance are key drivers of inequality in health education. The government should pay more attention to promoting health education and the policy of subsidizing health care among vulnerable people. Significantly improve awareness of health education with lower education, rural residential, to build confidence in economic recovery and life after COVID-19.

PMID:35548092 | CPM:PMC9082410 | DO I:10.3389/fpubh.2022.810488


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India Health Education Frameworks for Collaborations in the Digital World https://litmus-mme.com/india-health-education-frameworks-for-collaborations-in-the-digital-world/ Thu, 12 May 2022 19:22:09 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/india-health-education-frameworks-for-collaborations-in-the-digital-world/ Education and health have much in common. They both serve the greater social good and are basic human necessities. Looking at the course of the pandemic, these industries have also experienced a high degree of adaptability and, as a result, a significant boom. For example, instead of “going” to the doctor as we used to, […]]]>

Education and health have much in common. They both serve the greater social good and are basic human necessities. Looking at the course of the pandemic, these industries have also experienced a high degree of adaptability and, as a result, a significant boom. For example, instead of “going” to the doctor as we used to, the doctor goes home thanks to telemedicine. Instead of “going” to school, teaching is coming home through online courses. Adoption has been a two-way street – doctors and academics who were hesitant to go online earlier have also become very comfortable with this new approach, with some even moving exclusively to digital media. Due to comfort with technology, medical education and medical research have also moved online, opening up opportunities for cross-border collaboration.

Foreign universities and research institutes have always looked to India because of its brainpower, research, infrastructure and availability of resources. The ongoing conflict in Ukraine has further highlighted the need for more medical education resources, and India has already begun to step up its efforts. The use of digital medium for communication and monitoring makes it easier for foreign universities and institutes to work in India, without a presence on the ground, as long as they have the help of Indian partner institutes at their side.

One of the most common ways for foreign and Indian institutes to work together is through collaboration. Foreign educational institutes are licensing their existing research and R&D to an Indian counterpart and the parties are working together to leverage it. Overseas institute support can be provided through real-time online support. Often, collaborations aim to establish long-term R&D centers or centers of specialization or excellence in India. Since all efforts are focused on the development of valuable intellectual property, strong legal clauses, including those relating to confidentiality, are essential. If the collaboration is with an Indian university or college and the students are likely to receive a degree or diploma at the end of it, the revision of Indian education laws may also be important from the point of view of structuring and compliance.

There are variations to this model. One being where the license comes with services. Here, the foreign institute provides services like training and consulting. This too can happen via virtual mode. Even teaching services can be provided through online medium. Historically, there are also arrangements whereby foreign qualified doctors visit Indian medical colleges to teach students. While this works very well, it should be kept in mind that the movement of employees or the presence of employees of the foreign institute in India does not lead to the creation of a permanent establishment (PE), resulting in exposure tax for the foreign institute. The analysis is delicate, but important. If a PE is formed, the foreign institute would be taxed at 40% (excluding surcharge and franchise) in India on the profits attributable to such PE. Considering the high tax rate, online education services work better to minimize the risk of PE in India.

There has also been growing interest in collaborations for teleconsultations. Here, foreign doctors associated with a foreign medical institute, research center or university provide teleconsultations to Indian doctors. This model has been increasingly adopted, mainly because territorial limitations on the provision of medical advice still apply, which prevent foreign doctors from consulting Indian patients directly or prescribing drugs for treatment. Through doctor-to-doctor or second opinion consultations, Indian patients can always benefit from the global expertise of foreign doctors through their Indian referring doctor without having to travel across the globe. Indian doctors are also able to physically examine the patient (for in-person consultations) and prescribe medication based on the advice provided by the foreign doctor. However, some rules do not apply. For example, foreign institutes should ensure that medical advice is provided to the Indian doctor, who would then use his professional judgment to determine the best treatment for the patient. When patient data is shared, Indian privacy and data protection compliances should also be considered. The issue of liability and compensation in case of misuse of data, data breach or cause of negative impact due to reliance on advice should also be dealt with contractually. There is also an additional tax consideration – foreign telemedicine platforms may be considered an e-commerce operator for the purposes of Indian income tax laws. Payments made by Indian doctors, hospitals or patients to these platforms may result in an equalization tax of 2%, which is payable by the foreign provider to the Indian tax authorities.

When foreign doctors visit India, additional considerations would also apply. Currently, registered foreign doctors are allowed to undertake limited activities such as becoming an observer, for postgraduate training or fellowships with Indian institutions, provided that the foreign doctor obtains temporary registration with the National Medical Commission – the Indian Regulator of Medical Practice and Education – for this purpose. They are not allowed to examine patients or perform procedures per se. The responsibility for the actions of the foreign doctor during his visit lies with the institute, which is also responsible for applying for registration on behalf of the doctor. Advance planning would also be required, as the registration usually takes a few months to be issued. Given these restrictions and obligations, it may make sense to engage in teleconsultations or online teachings and research, rather than in-person visits.

There has also been an increase in the provision of mental health and general wellbeing services online. In fact, the Indian government announced the launch of a national tele-mental health program in the recent Union budget, given the overall toll of the pandemic on the Indian population. Foreign institutions looking to enter or collaborate with Indian partners in this space should keep in mind that clinical psychologists, counselors and nutritionists are regulated differently in India, with each specialty having requirements for obtaining a permitted under different Acts such as the Mental Health Act, 2017, the Rehabilitation Council of India Act 1992 and the recently introduced Allied Health National Commission Act 2021. While this may pose challenges for overseas professionals consulting directly with Indian patients, such as medical consultations, doctor-to-doctor consultation and second opinion models in collaboration with Indian partners can also be explored for the mental health space. and well-being.

Overall, many structures exist for collaboration opportunities between foreign universities, research centers or hospitals with their Indian counterparts in the field of medicine and medical education, research and consultancy. Most of them can now also be done in virtual mode. With proper planning, strategy and legal advice, virtual media can be a great way to explore opportunities for collaborative cross-border research and education – all for the greater good.

Nishith Desai Associates 2022. All rights reserved.National Law Review, Volume XII, Number 132


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Mental Health Support Group – Keweenaw area to host mental health education event on Wednesday https://litmus-mme.com/mental-health-support-group-keweenaw-area-to-host-mental-health-education-event-on-wednesday/ Tue, 10 May 2022 13:12:00 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/mental-health-support-group-keweenaw-area-to-host-mental-health-education-event-on-wednesday/ HOUGHTON, Mich. (WLUC) – A free public program about mental health services and challenges in the Houghton community will be held at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 11 at the Portage Lake District Library, 105 Huron St. in Houghton. The program is sponsored by the Mental Health Support Group – Keweenaw Area. Speakers include representatives from […]]]>

HOUGHTON, Mich. (WLUC) – A free public program about mental health services and challenges in the Houghton community will be held at 6 p.m. Wednesday, May 11 at the Portage Lake District Library, 105 Huron St. in Houghton. The program is sponsored by the Mental Health Support Group – Keweenaw Area.

Speakers include representatives from Dial Help, Copper Country Community Mental Health, Keweenaw Support 4 Healthy Minds, Unite Mental Health and Wellness and Mental Health Support Group – Keweenaw Area.

Each speaker will give a brief presentation on the direction and work of their organization. A question and answer period will follow.

In the Keweenaw, there are five main mental health support groups:

· The Keweenaw Area Mental Health Support Group provides support for people with mental health issues and their families.

· Copper Country Community Mental Health offers treatment for mental health issues.

· Dial Help provides crisis counseling and suicide prevention services.

· Keweenaw Support 4 Healthy Minds advocates for mental health.

· Unite Mental Health and Wellness helps connect people with specialist mental health care providers. Questions? Email: MHSG-KA@aol.com

Copyright 2022 WLUC. All rights reserved.


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Global Health Online Distance Education Among U.S. Medical Students During COVID-19 and Beyond | BMC medical training https://litmus-mme.com/global-health-online-distance-education-among-u-s-medical-students-during-covid-19-and-beyond-bmc-medical-training/ Tue, 10 May 2022 11:51:03 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/global-health-online-distance-education-among-u-s-medical-students-during-covid-19-and-beyond-bmc-medical-training/ CDC. COVID-19 and your health. Hundred. Say. Prev Control 2020 [cited 2021 Jun 8]. Available from: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/social-distancing.html Dhawan S. Online learning: A panacea in times of the COVID-19 crisis. J Educ Technol Syst. SAGE Publications Inc.; 2020;49:5–22. Article Google Scholar Lee SJ, Park J, Lee YJ, Lee S, Kim WH, Yoon HB. The feasibility and […]]]>
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    Public health education: need of time https://litmus-mme.com/public-health-education-need-of-time/ Sat, 07 May 2022 10:50:41 +0000 https://litmus-mme.com/public-health-education-need-of-time/ By Vivek Pattanayak* The central theme of public health concerns community health which includes the prevention of disease, illness, disease among the population, prophylactic action against epidemics, pandemics and the global scourge of deadly viruses, the promotion of hygiene and sanitation, the care of mother, child and adolescent health and, more recently, the health of […]]]>

    By Vivek Pattanayak*

    The central theme of public health concerns community health which includes the prevention of disease, illness, disease among the population, prophylactic action against epidemics, pandemics and the global scourge of deadly viruses, the promotion of hygiene and sanitation, the care of mother, child and adolescent health and, more recently, the health of the aging population.

    When talking about public health, it invariably refers to the health of the community. The word public is used as distinct from private. At the same time, the health of the individual and the health of the community are interdependent. One affects the other. Health can be considered in the immediate, but also in a long-term perspective.

    Sickness, disease and illness in the individual mean one thing, but when they affect a large number of people in the geographical vicinity at the same time, it is yet another thing.

    Sanitation and hygiene have their effect on both public and private health. Swachh Bharat designed to build public toilets is a public health program to improve sanitation and prevent the spread of airborne and waterborne diseases.

    Some diseases are infectious and spread quickly among nearby people. It can be epidemic or even pandemic.

    In the Middle Ages, the plague claimed victims in Europe, nearly decimating the population in various regions. Smallpox was a terrible disease. Its rapid spread led to the death of a large number of people. The prevention of this disease could be done by vaccination. Similarly, cholera claimed many human victims. The prevention of this disease was done by inoculation.

    Likewise, people with diseases arrived on ships from different countries and places. They could affect people living inland. Attempts were made to isolate people with infectious diseases by keeping them on the ship or in a designated area. To take these steps, the state and its agency had to be armed with legal power.

    Compulsory vaccination and inoculation had to be done on people who required legislation. Similarly, isolating affected people from the spread of infectious diseases required a quarantine law.

    Sometimes food adulteration can cause large-scale illnesses leading to death. Therefore, to prevent the adulteration of food law was necessary. Public health officials have been empowered to inspect food processing industries, hotels and restaurants.

    The production of vaccines, drugs, drugs, etc. should be regulated for patient safety. Inspection of the premises where production takes place is necessary to ensure that they are free from pollution and the production of drugs must meet the prescribed medical standards. For these purposes, laws had to be enacted.

    Doctors and health officials had to have certain qualifications and they had to maintain a certain code of conduct towards patients and their clients. Therefore, a law was needed to regulate them.

    Wars, hostilities and armed struggles have caused migrations. The temporary accommodation of refugees also in itself presents enormous public health risks and challenges.

    Prediction of an outbreak of unknown disease based on study of physicians, researchers, and public health experts is a field that is part of the discipline of public health.

    In terms of economic and social costs and benefits to the nation, public health plays an important role. The relevance of the oft-repeated cliché “prevention is better than cure” should not be underestimated.

    In long-term infant mortality, deaths during pregnancy and childbirth, stunting has demographic consequences. It is the demographic dividend that propels the nation’s development and prosperity. Thus, one can visualize the magnitude of the cost to the country in the absence of a well-designed community health program.

    In 20and and the 21st century, the world has experienced several types of epidemics like Spanish flu, SARS, Ebola, Zika virus, swine flu, camel flu, etc. transport but more specifically because of transoceanic air transport with jumbo jets.

    Since late 2019 and early 2020, the most terrible pandemic in recorded history has been experienced across the world with the rapid spread of Covid 19. No country has escaped this devastating disease.

    According to the World Health Organization, as of May 3, 2022, worldwide there were 511,965,711 confirmed cases of COVID-19, including 6,240,619 deaths. As of May 1, 2022, a total of 11,532,661,625 vaccine doses have been administered. The pharmaceutical industry, after two years of intensive research, a conscious and determined effort began to find drugs to cure the disease.

    From this information and reports from the IMF and the World Bank, one can imagine the extent of the damage suffered by the world’s population and its consequences on the world economy and the impact it has on life in general. Falling global GDP, sickness of industries, supply chain disruption, large-scale unemployment and rising poverty have been the aftermath of shutdowns, quarantine and disruption of the transport system .

    The world has therefore woken up to the new reality that community health must be a top priority. While the study of medicine had been given importance in the past, including community health for those who joined medical schools for an MBBS degree, public health has now become a specialized field of study. It is a discipline in its own right. Subject includes epidemiology, child and maternal health, public health regulation and ethics, biostatistics, population science, health systems, health policy, health economics, environmental health and sustainable development, strategic management in public health, etc.

    The need to have public health professionals is increasingly felt not only in governments, be it at the level of central governments, states, but also in local communities like municipalities, Zilla Parishad and Panchayat Samitis, but also by legal persons as part of their CSR. program and NGOs. Job opportunities for public health professionals have increased after the pandemic. Not only does the demand exist in India, but it is increasing in emerging markets, developing countries and underdeveloped countries.

    In recent years, public health as a specialized study has gained popularity in India. Interestingly, a university dedicated to public health called Asian Institute of Public Health has been established in Odisha for a few years. Now is a more appropriate time for decision makers in the public domain to focus on public health education.

    * The author is a former bureaucrat and held senior positions in the aviation and energy regulator. He can be contacted by email at vivekpattanaya[email protected]

    DISCLAIMER: The opinions expressed in the article are solely those of the author and in no way represent the opinions of Sambad English.


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